You are here: Home » Companies » Start-ups » Around the World
Business Standard

How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation, reports Tech in Asia

Tim Lin I Tech in Asia 

Future imperfect for Indian startups

Like many countries after the 2008 financial crisis, Taiwan’s unemployment rate rose with no signs of stopping. Coupled with the country’s deep rooted values in academic excellence and career advancement, stability became paramount.

In a time when stability was paramount, risk was out of the question and so were start-ups.

However, in recent years, Taiwan has been gearing to become the epicentre of in Asia Pacific for a multitude of reasons. It ranks 15th in global competitiveness, 10th in and has one of the largest populations of software and hardware engineers in the world.

This workforce is responsible for parts of Tesla’s original design as well as the production of flagship products by global electronics leaders like Apple, Sony, and Microsoft. The country has also dominated the semiconductor industry for over three decades.

Technological centres and clusters are also growing organically throughout major cities.

These characteristics give Taiwan a unique regional and international advantage. However, there are institutional and cultural barriers limiting growth. 

A decade ago, many of the top talent joined established companies such as Foxconn and TSMC. While these major companies held their market positions, they deprived start-ups of great talent. Larry Wang, CEO of Taiwan Entrepreneurship Center, shares his unique perspective.
How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

“The most difficult hurdle to overcome is the mindset,” he says. “Now, the mindset of entrepreneurship has changed and the awareness of start-ups has been revived. Top talents want to start start-ups. This community is now collaborating to grow new markets.”

Aside from the organic shift in mentality, Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation.


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation, reports Tech in Asia

Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation, reports Tech in Asia
Like many countries after the 2008 financial crisis, Taiwan’s unemployment rate rose with no signs of stopping. Coupled with the country’s deep rooted values in academic excellence and career advancement, stability became paramount.

In a time when stability was paramount, risk was out of the question and so were start-ups.

However, in recent years, Taiwan has been gearing to become the epicentre of in Asia Pacific for a multitude of reasons. It ranks 15th in global competitiveness, 10th in and has one of the largest populations of software and hardware engineers in the world.

This workforce is responsible for parts of Tesla’s original design as well as the production of flagship products by global electronics leaders like Apple, Sony, and Microsoft. The country has also dominated the semiconductor industry for over three decades.

Technological centres and clusters are also growing organically throughout major cities.

These characteristics give Taiwan a unique regional and international advantage. However, there are institutional and cultural barriers limiting growth. 

A decade ago, many of the top talent joined established companies such as Foxconn and TSMC. While these major companies held their market positions, they deprived start-ups of great talent. Larry Wang, CEO of Taiwan Entrepreneurship Center, shares his unique perspective.
How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

“The most difficult hurdle to overcome is the mindset,” he says. “Now, the mindset of entrepreneurship has changed and the awareness of start-ups has been revived. Top talents want to start start-ups. This community is now collaborating to grow new markets.”

Aside from the organic shift in mentality, Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation.


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

image
Business Standard
177 22

How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation, reports Tech in Asia

Like many countries after the 2008 financial crisis, Taiwan’s unemployment rate rose with no signs of stopping. Coupled with the country’s deep rooted values in academic excellence and career advancement, stability became paramount.

In a time when stability was paramount, risk was out of the question and so were start-ups.

However, in recent years, Taiwan has been gearing to become the epicentre of in Asia Pacific for a multitude of reasons. It ranks 15th in global competitiveness, 10th in and has one of the largest populations of software and hardware engineers in the world.

This workforce is responsible for parts of Tesla’s original design as well as the production of flagship products by global electronics leaders like Apple, Sony, and Microsoft. The country has also dominated the semiconductor industry for over three decades.

Technological centres and clusters are also growing organically throughout major cities.

These characteristics give Taiwan a unique regional and international advantage. However, there are institutional and cultural barriers limiting growth. 

A decade ago, many of the top talent joined established companies such as Foxconn and TSMC. While these major companies held their market positions, they deprived start-ups of great talent. Larry Wang, CEO of Taiwan Entrepreneurship Center, shares his unique perspective.
How Taiwan will become a major Asian start-up hub

“The most difficult hurdle to overcome is the mindset,” he says. “Now, the mindset of entrepreneurship has changed and the awareness of start-ups has been revived. Top talents want to start start-ups. This community is now collaborating to grow new markets.”

Aside from the organic shift in mentality, Taiwan is also taking active measures to cultivate an environment for innovation.


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard