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Now enjoy Happy Hour with your cat

Alcohol-free wines make the pet loopy and the owner happy

Carol Pogash | NYT 

Alcohol-free drinks for cats
An eight-ounce bottle of Catbernet or Pinot Meow from Apollo Peak sells for $11.95. Pet Winery’s 12-ounce bottle of Meow & Chandon costs $14.95 Photo: istock

Why drink alone when you can drink with your

The question comes from two competing start-ups in the unlikely product category of faux for cats (and, to a lesser extent, dogs) that comes in miniature bottles with cutesy names. No is involved (think liquid catnip). But already the company that brought its products to market first, — which calls itself “the original winery” — is accusing its newer competitor, Winery, of being a copycat.

Both ran discount promotions for Valentine’s Day. Both have come up with clever names for their products: For $11.95, people can buy Fluffy an 8-ounce bottle of Catbernet or Pinot Meow from Apollo Peak, which is based in

Or for $14.95, they can pour 12 ounces of Meow & Chandon from Winery of Fort Myers, Florida.

Since can harm cats, these products are essentially catnip water, which can make a loopy and an owner happy.

But based on a tasting I conducted at a local cafe-slash-adoption centre, the products are primarily catnip for the owners: The shelter cats did not like wines from either company — only two of them indulged — but the people visiting the tastings loved the concept.

“That’s the greatest thing ever,” said Savannah Thrasher, 23, a medical biller who was at the Town Café here. “It would be good if my can enjoy with me,” she said.

It all started two years ago when Brandon Zavala, the chief executive of Apollo Peak, “spawned the idea of for cats out of nowhere”, he said. “A is more like a friend, a roommate or a family member,” 

he said. “Why are we just feeding them water?”

Zavala, 32, used to sell food products and has been learning more about the business through his start-up. Initially he called his product a “snack beverage”. If he had not changed it to wines, he said, “it wouldn’t have gone viral”.

He named his business for his cat, Apollo, and for the mountains of Organic beets from California provide the colouring. The catnip comes from the higher elevations of Colorado. His small bottles are sold online and in 200 stores, including T. J. Maxx and Marshalls. Zavala imbues his products with sayings like “Making Cats Great Again” and #whydrinkalone.

wines are the latest manifestation of a growing trend of owners treating them like people.

Over the past 15 years, “the market has been transformed by humanisation of pets”, said David Sprinkle, the research director at marketresearch.com. A survey his organisation conducted last year found that 62 per cent of owners (and 64 per cent of dog owners) consider their to be part of the family.

“The term ‘parent’ has increasingly replaced ‘owner’,” Sprinkle said. products and supplies make up 30 per cent of the $40-billion United States market, excluding services, he said.

© 2017 New York Times News Service

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Now enjoy Happy Hour with your cat

Alcohol-free wines make the pet loopy and the owner happy

Alcohol-free wines make the pet loopy and the owner happy
Why drink alone when you can drink with your

The question comes from two competing start-ups in the unlikely product category of faux for cats (and, to a lesser extent, dogs) that comes in miniature bottles with cutesy names. No is involved (think liquid catnip). But already the company that brought its products to market first, — which calls itself “the original winery” — is accusing its newer competitor, Winery, of being a copycat.

Both ran discount promotions for Valentine’s Day. Both have come up with clever names for their products: For $11.95, people can buy Fluffy an 8-ounce bottle of Catbernet or Pinot Meow from Apollo Peak, which is based in

Or for $14.95, they can pour 12 ounces of Meow & Chandon from Winery of Fort Myers, Florida.

Since can harm cats, these products are essentially catnip water, which can make a loopy and an owner happy.

But based on a tasting I conducted at a local cafe-slash-adoption centre, the products are primarily catnip for the owners: The shelter cats did not like wines from either company — only two of them indulged — but the people visiting the tastings loved the concept.

“That’s the greatest thing ever,” said Savannah Thrasher, 23, a medical biller who was at the Town Café here. “It would be good if my can enjoy with me,” she said.

It all started two years ago when Brandon Zavala, the chief executive of Apollo Peak, “spawned the idea of for cats out of nowhere”, he said. “A is more like a friend, a roommate or a family member,” 

he said. “Why are we just feeding them water?”

Zavala, 32, used to sell food products and has been learning more about the business through his start-up. Initially he called his product a “snack beverage”. If he had not changed it to wines, he said, “it wouldn’t have gone viral”.

He named his business for his cat, Apollo, and for the mountains of Organic beets from California provide the colouring. The catnip comes from the higher elevations of Colorado. His small bottles are sold online and in 200 stores, including T. J. Maxx and Marshalls. Zavala imbues his products with sayings like “Making Cats Great Again” and #whydrinkalone.

wines are the latest manifestation of a growing trend of owners treating them like people.

Over the past 15 years, “the market has been transformed by humanisation of pets”, said David Sprinkle, the research director at marketresearch.com. A survey his organisation conducted last year found that 62 per cent of owners (and 64 per cent of dog owners) consider their to be part of the family.

“The term ‘parent’ has increasingly replaced ‘owner’,” Sprinkle said. products and supplies make up 30 per cent of the $40-billion United States market, excluding services, he said.

© 2017 New York Times News Service

image
Business Standard
177 22

Now enjoy Happy Hour with your cat

Alcohol-free wines make the pet loopy and the owner happy

Why drink alone when you can drink with your

The question comes from two competing start-ups in the unlikely product category of faux for cats (and, to a lesser extent, dogs) that comes in miniature bottles with cutesy names. No is involved (think liquid catnip). But already the company that brought its products to market first, — which calls itself “the original winery” — is accusing its newer competitor, Winery, of being a copycat.

Both ran discount promotions for Valentine’s Day. Both have come up with clever names for their products: For $11.95, people can buy Fluffy an 8-ounce bottle of Catbernet or Pinot Meow from Apollo Peak, which is based in

Or for $14.95, they can pour 12 ounces of Meow & Chandon from Winery of Fort Myers, Florida.

Since can harm cats, these products are essentially catnip water, which can make a loopy and an owner happy.

But based on a tasting I conducted at a local cafe-slash-adoption centre, the products are primarily catnip for the owners: The shelter cats did not like wines from either company — only two of them indulged — but the people visiting the tastings loved the concept.

“That’s the greatest thing ever,” said Savannah Thrasher, 23, a medical biller who was at the Town Café here. “It would be good if my can enjoy with me,” she said.

It all started two years ago when Brandon Zavala, the chief executive of Apollo Peak, “spawned the idea of for cats out of nowhere”, he said. “A is more like a friend, a roommate or a family member,” 

he said. “Why are we just feeding them water?”

Zavala, 32, used to sell food products and has been learning more about the business through his start-up. Initially he called his product a “snack beverage”. If he had not changed it to wines, he said, “it wouldn’t have gone viral”.

He named his business for his cat, Apollo, and for the mountains of Organic beets from California provide the colouring. The catnip comes from the higher elevations of Colorado. His small bottles are sold online and in 200 stores, including T. J. Maxx and Marshalls. Zavala imbues his products with sayings like “Making Cats Great Again” and #whydrinkalone.

wines are the latest manifestation of a growing trend of owners treating them like people.

Over the past 15 years, “the market has been transformed by humanisation of pets”, said David Sprinkle, the research director at marketresearch.com. A survey his organisation conducted last year found that 62 per cent of owners (and 64 per cent of dog owners) consider their to be part of the family.

“The term ‘parent’ has increasingly replaced ‘owner’,” Sprinkle said. products and supplies make up 30 per cent of the $40-billion United States market, excluding services, he said.

© 2017 New York Times News Service

image
Business Standard
177 22