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VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

Professor Saras Sarasvathy says have someone pay you to build the product, reports Tech in Asia

Malavika Velayanikal | Tech in Asia 

Representative image
Representative image

They think the products they are building are worth an X amount of money and there is a market of millions or even billions of dollars out there. In predicting the future, these bright, young entrepreneurs are nailing the first, fat nail into their start-ups’ coffins. Professor is sitting on enough data to tell us this.

"In Bangalore, they are doing more of it because they think predicting the future is the way to get funding. They are not even predicting the future to get the customer; they are predicting the future to get VC money!" Professor Saras says.

She is one of the top scholars in the world on the cognitive basis for high-performance entrepreneurship. She is a professor at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, and also teaches doctoral programmes in entrepreneurship and business strategy across Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

It turns out that these successful get their money from customers. Or suppliers. Or both. is a big example, the professor points out. "Who funded paid for their software because they wanted that. That is how was built. When the customer actually pays for what you are building, you have built something that the customer actually wants. Then you can turn around and sell that software to others too," she says.

VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

This is the kind of stakeholder partnership that the professor is championing as a viable alternative to funding.

"If somebody is not paying you to build the product, you are betting that your product is something people might buy. Then, you are in the gambling business," she says.
This is an excerpt from an article published on TechInAsia. You can read the full story here

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VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

Professor Saras Sarasvathy says have someone pay you to build the product, reports Tech in Asia

Professor Saras Sarasvathy says have someone pay you to build the product, reports Tech in Asia
They think the products they are building are worth an X amount of money and there is a market of millions or even billions of dollars out there. In predicting the future, these bright, young entrepreneurs are nailing the first, fat nail into their start-ups’ coffins. Professor is sitting on enough data to tell us this.

"In Bangalore, they are doing more of it because they think predicting the future is the way to get funding. They are not even predicting the future to get the customer; they are predicting the future to get VC money!" Professor Saras says.

She is one of the top scholars in the world on the cognitive basis for high-performance entrepreneurship. She is a professor at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, and also teaches doctoral programmes in entrepreneurship and business strategy across Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

It turns out that these successful get their money from customers. Or suppliers. Or both. is a big example, the professor points out. "Who funded paid for their software because they wanted that. That is how was built. When the customer actually pays for what you are building, you have built something that the customer actually wants. Then you can turn around and sell that software to others too," she says.

VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

This is the kind of stakeholder partnership that the professor is championing as a viable alternative to funding.

"If somebody is not paying you to build the product, you are betting that your product is something people might buy. Then, you are in the gambling business," she says.
This is an excerpt from an article published on TechInAsia. You can read the full story here

image
Business Standard
177 22

VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

Professor Saras Sarasvathy says have someone pay you to build the product, reports Tech in Asia

They think the products they are building are worth an X amount of money and there is a market of millions or even billions of dollars out there. In predicting the future, these bright, young entrepreneurs are nailing the first, fat nail into their start-ups’ coffins. Professor is sitting on enough data to tell us this.

"In Bangalore, they are doing more of it because they think predicting the future is the way to get funding. They are not even predicting the future to get the customer; they are predicting the future to get VC money!" Professor Saras says.

She is one of the top scholars in the world on the cognitive basis for high-performance entrepreneurship. She is a professor at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, and also teaches doctoral programmes in entrepreneurship and business strategy across Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

It turns out that these successful get their money from customers. Or suppliers. Or both. is a big example, the professor points out. "Who funded paid for their software because they wanted that. That is how was built. When the customer actually pays for what you are building, you have built something that the customer actually wants. Then you can turn around and sell that software to others too," she says.

VCs could be bad for your start-up. Here's an alternate model of funding

This is the kind of stakeholder partnership that the professor is championing as a viable alternative to funding.

"If somebody is not paying you to build the product, you are betting that your product is something people might buy. Then, you are in the gambling business," she says.
This is an excerpt from an article published on TechInAsia. You can read the full story here

image
Business Standard
177 22