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Demonetisation effect: Fitch cuts India's FY17 growth forecast to 6.9% from 7.4%

Fitch said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the cash crunch

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi (pic: Reuters)
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi. Photo: Reuters

Fitch Ratings today lowered India's growth forecast for this fiscal to 6.9 per cent from 7.4 per cent, saying there will be "temporary disruptions" to economic activity post demonetisation.

It said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the created by withdrawal and replacement of 500 and 1000 rupee notes that accounted for 86 per cent of the value of currency in circulation.

"Indian growth has also been revised down to reflect temporary disruptions to activity related to the RBI's surprise of large-denomination bank notes," Fitch said, as it revised real growth forecast down to 6.9 per cent for 2016-17, from 7.4 per cent projected earlier.

The US-based ratings agency also revised growth forecast for 2017-18 and 2018-19 lower to 7.7 per cent from 8 per cent earlier.

"Gradual implementation of the structural reform agenda is expected to contribute to higher growth, as will higher real disposable income, supported by an almost 24 per cent hike in civil servants' wages.

"But the anticipated recovery in investment looks a bit less certain in light of ongoing weakness in the data," Fitch said in its 'Global Economic Outlook - November' report.

Regarding currency ban, it said consumers do not have the cash needed to complete purchases, and there have been reports of supply chains being disrupted and farmers unable to buy seeds and fertiliser for the sowing season.

"Time spent queueing in banks is also likely to have affected general productivity. The impact on growth will increase the longer the disruption continues," Fitch said, adding the medium-term effect of the currency withdrawal on growth is uncertain, but is unlikely to be large.

"Most importantly, is a one-off event. People who operate in the informal sector will still be able to use the new high-denomination bills and other options (such as gold) to store their wealth," it added.

Demonetisation effect: Fitch cuts India's FY17 growth forecast to 6.9% from 7.4%

Fitch said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the cash crunch

Fitch said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the cash crunch Fitch Ratings today lowered India's growth forecast for this fiscal to 6.9 per cent from 7.4 per cent, saying there will be "temporary disruptions" to economic activity post demonetisation.

It said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the created by withdrawal and replacement of 500 and 1000 rupee notes that accounted for 86 per cent of the value of currency in circulation.

"Indian growth has also been revised down to reflect temporary disruptions to activity related to the RBI's surprise of large-denomination bank notes," Fitch said, as it revised real growth forecast down to 6.9 per cent for 2016-17, from 7.4 per cent projected earlier.

The US-based ratings agency also revised growth forecast for 2017-18 and 2018-19 lower to 7.7 per cent from 8 per cent earlier.

"Gradual implementation of the structural reform agenda is expected to contribute to higher growth, as will higher real disposable income, supported by an almost 24 per cent hike in civil servants' wages.

"But the anticipated recovery in investment looks a bit less certain in light of ongoing weakness in the data," Fitch said in its 'Global Economic Outlook - November' report.

Regarding currency ban, it said consumers do not have the cash needed to complete purchases, and there have been reports of supply chains being disrupted and farmers unable to buy seeds and fertiliser for the sowing season.

"Time spent queueing in banks is also likely to have affected general productivity. The impact on growth will increase the longer the disruption continues," Fitch said, adding the medium-term effect of the currency withdrawal on growth is uncertain, but is unlikely to be large.

"Most importantly, is a one-off event. People who operate in the informal sector will still be able to use the new high-denomination bills and other options (such as gold) to store their wealth," it added.
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Business Standard
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Demonetisation effect: Fitch cuts India's FY17 growth forecast to 6.9% from 7.4%

Fitch said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the cash crunch

Fitch Ratings today lowered India's growth forecast for this fiscal to 6.9 per cent from 7.4 per cent, saying there will be "temporary disruptions" to economic activity post demonetisation.

It said economic activity will be hit in the October- December quarter because of the created by withdrawal and replacement of 500 and 1000 rupee notes that accounted for 86 per cent of the value of currency in circulation.

"Indian growth has also been revised down to reflect temporary disruptions to activity related to the RBI's surprise of large-denomination bank notes," Fitch said, as it revised real growth forecast down to 6.9 per cent for 2016-17, from 7.4 per cent projected earlier.

The US-based ratings agency also revised growth forecast for 2017-18 and 2018-19 lower to 7.7 per cent from 8 per cent earlier.

"Gradual implementation of the structural reform agenda is expected to contribute to higher growth, as will higher real disposable income, supported by an almost 24 per cent hike in civil servants' wages.

"But the anticipated recovery in investment looks a bit less certain in light of ongoing weakness in the data," Fitch said in its 'Global Economic Outlook - November' report.

Regarding currency ban, it said consumers do not have the cash needed to complete purchases, and there have been reports of supply chains being disrupted and farmers unable to buy seeds and fertiliser for the sowing season.

"Time spent queueing in banks is also likely to have affected general productivity. The impact on growth will increase the longer the disruption continues," Fitch said, adding the medium-term effect of the currency withdrawal on growth is uncertain, but is unlikely to be large.

"Most importantly, is a one-off event. People who operate in the informal sector will still be able to use the new high-denomination bills and other options (such as gold) to store their wealth," it added.

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