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Majority of Americans fear Trump presidency: Poll

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too

More than half the country fears a Trump presidency. And only about a third of believe he is at least somewhat qualified to serve in the White House. In the final sprint to Election Day, a new poll underscores those daunting roadblocks for as he tries to overtake Hillary Clinton.

Moreover, most voters of the Associated Press-GfK poll oppose the hard-line approach to immigration that is a centrepiece of the billionaire businessman's campaign. They are more likely to trust to handle a variety of issues facing the country, and Trump has no advantage on the national security topics also at the forefront of his bid.

Trump undoubtedly has a passionate base of support, seen clearly among the thousands of backers who fill the stands at his signature rallies. But most people don't share that fervour. Only 29 per cent of registered voters would be excited and just 24 percent would be proud should Trump prevail in November.

Only one in four voters find him even somewhat civil or compassionate, and just a third say he's not at all racist. "We as should be embarrassed about Donald Trump," said Michael DeLuise, 66, a retired university vice president and registered Republican who lives in Eugene, Oregon. "We as have always been able to look at the wacky leaders of other countries and say 'Phew, that's not us.' We couldn't if Trump wins. It's like putting PT Barnum in charge. And it's getting dangerous."

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too. Only 39 per cent of voters have a favourable view of the Democratic nominee, compared to the 56 percent who view her unfavourably. Less than a third say they would be excited or proud should she move into the White House.

"I think she's an extremely dishonest person and have extreme disdain for her and her husband," said one registered Republican, Denise Pettitte, 36, from Watertown, Wisconsin. "I think it would be wonderful to elect a woman, but a different woman."

But as poorly as voters may view Clinton, they think even less of Trump.

Forty-four per cent say they would be afraid if Clinton, the former secretary of state, is elected, far less than say the same of Trump. He's viewed more unfavourably than favourably by a 61 percent to 34 per cent margin, and more say their unfavourable opinion of the New Yorker is a strong one than say the same of Clinton, 50 per cent to 44 per cent.

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Business Standard
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Business Standard

Majority of Americans fear Trump presidency: Poll

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too

AP/PTI  |  New York 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump

More than half the country fears a Trump presidency. And only about a third of believe he is at least somewhat qualified to serve in the White House. In the final sprint to Election Day, a new poll underscores those daunting roadblocks for as he tries to overtake Hillary Clinton.

Moreover, most voters of the Associated Press-GfK poll oppose the hard-line approach to immigration that is a centrepiece of the billionaire businessman's campaign. They are more likely to trust to handle a variety of issues facing the country, and Trump has no advantage on the national security topics also at the forefront of his bid.

Trump undoubtedly has a passionate base of support, seen clearly among the thousands of backers who fill the stands at his signature rallies. But most people don't share that fervour. Only 29 per cent of registered voters would be excited and just 24 percent would be proud should Trump prevail in November.

Only one in four voters find him even somewhat civil or compassionate, and just a third say he's not at all racist. "We as should be embarrassed about Donald Trump," said Michael DeLuise, 66, a retired university vice president and registered Republican who lives in Eugene, Oregon. "We as have always been able to look at the wacky leaders of other countries and say 'Phew, that's not us.' We couldn't if Trump wins. It's like putting PT Barnum in charge. And it's getting dangerous."

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too. Only 39 per cent of voters have a favourable view of the Democratic nominee, compared to the 56 percent who view her unfavourably. Less than a third say they would be excited or proud should she move into the White House.

"I think she's an extremely dishonest person and have extreme disdain for her and her husband," said one registered Republican, Denise Pettitte, 36, from Watertown, Wisconsin. "I think it would be wonderful to elect a woman, but a different woman."

But as poorly as voters may view Clinton, they think even less of Trump.

Forty-four per cent say they would be afraid if Clinton, the former secretary of state, is elected, far less than say the same of Trump. He's viewed more unfavourably than favourably by a 61 percent to 34 per cent margin, and more say their unfavourable opinion of the New Yorker is a strong one than say the same of Clinton, 50 per cent to 44 per cent.

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Majority of Americans fear Trump presidency: Poll

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too
More than half the country fears a Trump presidency. And only about a third of believe he is at least somewhat qualified to serve in the White House. In the final sprint to Election Day, a new poll underscores those daunting roadblocks for as he tries to overtake Hillary Clinton.

Moreover, most voters of the Associated Press-GfK poll oppose the hard-line approach to immigration that is a centrepiece of the billionaire businessman's campaign. They are more likely to trust to handle a variety of issues facing the country, and Trump has no advantage on the national security topics also at the forefront of his bid.

Trump undoubtedly has a passionate base of support, seen clearly among the thousands of backers who fill the stands at his signature rallies. But most people don't share that fervour. Only 29 per cent of registered voters would be excited and just 24 percent would be proud should Trump prevail in November.

Only one in four voters find him even somewhat civil or compassionate, and just a third say he's not at all racist. "We as should be embarrassed about Donald Trump," said Michael DeLuise, 66, a retired university vice president and registered Republican who lives in Eugene, Oregon. "We as have always been able to look at the wacky leaders of other countries and say 'Phew, that's not us.' We couldn't if Trump wins. It's like putting PT Barnum in charge. And it's getting dangerous."

To be sure, the nation is sour on Clinton, too. Only 39 per cent of voters have a favourable view of the Democratic nominee, compared to the 56 percent who view her unfavourably. Less than a third say they would be excited or proud should she move into the White House.

"I think she's an extremely dishonest person and have extreme disdain for her and her husband," said one registered Republican, Denise Pettitte, 36, from Watertown, Wisconsin. "I think it would be wonderful to elect a woman, but a different woman."

But as poorly as voters may view Clinton, they think even less of Trump.

Forty-four per cent say they would be afraid if Clinton, the former secretary of state, is elected, far less than say the same of Trump. He's viewed more unfavourably than favourably by a 61 percent to 34 per cent margin, and more say their unfavourable opinion of the New Yorker is a strong one than say the same of Clinton, 50 per cent to 44 per cent.
image
Business Standard
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