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Modi's vision for new India to create thousands of US jobs: Sean Spicer

Unlike Xi's and Abe's visits, Modi's trip will take place while Trump is under political stress

Agencies  |  New York 

Narendra Modi
Narendra Modi

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's "vision for a new India" will also help create jobs in the US, President Donald Trump's Press Secretary said while announcing Modi's visit scheduled for June 26.

Addressing the common interests of the two countries in an environment where Trump's promotion of a policy of "Buy American, hire American" is stoking apprehensions in India, Spicer on Monday said: "energy and technologies, including natural gas, are helping to build Prime Minister Modi's vision for a new India and creating thousands of American jobs in the process."

"has grown six-fold since 2000, from $19 billion to $115 billion in 2016."

"And the Indian economy is growing at over 7 per cent," he said adding a note of optimism for the future.

The White House's spin on job creation by India in the is in contrast to Trump's comments about jobs fleeing to China and elsewhere.

In April, Trump ordered a review of trade with countries with which runs a deficit. India is on that list, although with deficit of $24 billion in pales in comparison with China's $347 billion.

The job creation comment also skirts the issues of Trump's plans to curb outsourcing and to cut back on visas for professionals that New Delhi fears will turn off the spigot for Indian technical talent and businesses heading to the

Spicer said that during the visit the two leaders "will look to outline a common vision for the US-India partnership that is worthy of their 1.6 billion citizens."

Laying out their agenda, the press secretary said: "The President looks forward to discussing ways to strengthen ties between the United States and India and to advance our common priorities: fighting terrorism, promoting economic growth and reforms, and expanding security cooperation in the Indo-Pacific region."

External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj in her annual press meet last week, however, said Modi would also raise the issues surrounding the US' plans to reduce the number of H-1B visa slots that are mainly used by Indian IT workers.

Trump invited Modi to Washington after the Indian leader rang him in January to congratulate the new president on his inauguration.

The bilateral talks appear to be no bed of roses as they come amidst thorny issues like US' plans to reduce the number of H-1B visa slots that are mainly used by Indian IT workers, and its withdrawal from the historic climate accord.


The said that the has grown six-fold since 2000, from $19 billion to $115 billion in 2016, despite the recent hiccups over the H1-B visa issue.

"energy and technologies, including natural gas, are helping to build Prime Minister Modi's vision for a new India and creating thousands of jobs in the process," Spicer said.

Notably, Modi's visit, which would begin on June 25, comes in the backdrop of Trump's announcement to withdraw the from the historic Paris Climate Agreement signed by over 190 other countries.

In his announcement of the decision for which he received a global condemnation, Trump had blamed India and China for the withdrawal.

"India makes its participation contingent on receiving billions and billions of dollars from developed countries," he had said.

Strongly rejecting Trump's contention, India said it signed the Paris deal not under duress or for lure of money but due to its commitment to protect the environment.

During his visit to France this month, Modi even said that India would "go above and beyond" the Paris deal to protect climate for the future generations.

Apart from ways to enhance trade and business cooperation, Modi and Trump are expected to discuss defence ties.

Modi's visit will come while Trump is under political stress because of alleged Russian interference in elections last year and contacts by member of his inner circle with Kremlin-connected figures.

While the details of Trump's plans to host Modi have not yet emerged, the visit stands in contrast to the feting of Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's personal retreat, Mar-a-Lago in Florida in a more relaxed atmosphere.

A reason why Mar-a-Lago may be out is that it is hot in summer in Florida and lately Trump has been going to his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, on weekends.

A visit would signal a more business like meeting rather than a bonding session, unless Trump takes him on a jaunt around the capital like former President Barack Obama had during Modi's first visit to the as Prime Minister.

Unlike Xi's and Abe's visits, Modi's trip will take place while Trump is under tremendous political stress.

Trump is under heightened political pressure because of alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and contacts by member of his inner circle with Kremlin-connected figures.

A special prosecutor is looking into the allegations and a Senate committee has been holding hearings.

First Published: Tue, June 13 2017. 15:05 IST
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