Republican governors may accept Obamacare

After a hard-fought campaign against “Obamacare” during elections, many Republican governors, including Indian-American Bobby Jindal, are reluctantly opening the door to the controversial legislation, aimed at reducing the overall costs of health care in the US. Jindal, the Indian-American governor of Louisiana, in Texas, in Ohio and in Wisconsin, among others, are to invite the to set up a health insurance exchange in their states under the law they derided as “Obamacare” not long ago.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care.

"These Republican governors, and more than a dozen others in red states around the country, have decided it's better to have 'Obamacare' forced on them than to legitimise it by setting up their own exchanges, even if that means empowering the federal government at the expense of the states," the Politico said.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care. It provides a number of mechanisms, including mandates, subsidies, and tax credits—to employers and individuals in order to increase the coverage rate.

Jindal, 41, a health policy expert by trade, was quoted by the Huffington Post as saying that while he's not going to set up an exchange, he hopes that Obama's second term will bring more cooperation between the federal government and the states on a range of health care issues.

"We are certainly going to go to the president and give him a chance to actually be bipartisan and give him a chance to give us the flexibility to bring more market-based competition and ideas into health care programmes, and I hope he'll work with us to do that," Jindal said.

It's a stick in the eye of a just re-elected President, whose healthcare plan is still opposed by about half the country and an indication that some have no intention of backing down just because President won another four years. By Friday, 19 states had indicated they would let the federal government run their exchanges, most of which went to Mitt Romney on Election Day.

Another 11 states were officially undeclared, while 20 states and the District of Columbia had announced they would set up exchanges partially or fully run by their states. The Republican governors of several big states, including Florida's Rick Scott, New Jersey's and Arizona's Jan Brewer, remain in the undecided column.

That may have factored into federal health officials' decision to postpone Friday's planned deadline for signing up until mid-December. The Republican Governors Association had asked for the extension and applauded it when it was announced on Thursday.

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Republican governors may accept Obamacare

Press Trust On India 



After a hard-fought campaign against “Obamacare” during elections, many Republican governors, including Indian-American Bobby Jindal, are reluctantly opening the door to the controversial legislation, aimed at reducing the overall costs of health care in the US. Jindal, the Indian-American governor of Louisiana, in Texas, in Ohio and in Wisconsin, among others, are to invite the to set up a health insurance exchange in their states under the law they derided as “Obamacare” not long ago.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care.

"These Republican governors, and more than a dozen others in red states around the country, have decided it's better to have 'Obamacare' forced on them than to legitimise it by setting up their own exchanges, even if that means empowering the federal government at the expense of the states," the Politico said.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care. It provides a number of mechanisms, including mandates, subsidies, and tax credits—to employers and individuals in order to increase the coverage rate.

Jindal, 41, a health policy expert by trade, was quoted by the Huffington Post as saying that while he's not going to set up an exchange, he hopes that Obama's second term will bring more cooperation between the federal government and the states on a range of health care issues.

"We are certainly going to go to the president and give him a chance to actually be bipartisan and give him a chance to give us the flexibility to bring more market-based competition and ideas into health care programmes, and I hope he'll work with us to do that," Jindal said.

It's a stick in the eye of a just re-elected President, whose healthcare plan is still opposed by about half the country and an indication that some have no intention of backing down just because President won another four years. By Friday, 19 states had indicated they would let the federal government run their exchanges, most of which went to Mitt Romney on Election Day.

Another 11 states were officially undeclared, while 20 states and the District of Columbia had announced they would set up exchanges partially or fully run by their states. The Republican governors of several big states, including Florida's Rick Scott, New Jersey's and Arizona's Jan Brewer, remain in the undecided column.

That may have factored into federal health officials' decision to postpone Friday's planned deadline for signing up until mid-December. The Republican Governors Association had asked for the extension and applauded it when it was announced on Thursday.

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Republican governors may accept Obamacare

After a hard-fought campaign against “Obamacare” during elections, many Republican governors, including Indian-American Bobby Jindal, are reluctantly opening the door to the controversial legislation, aimed at reducing the overall costs of health care in the US. Jindal, the Indian-American governor of Louisiana, Rick Perry in Texas, John Kasich in Ohio and Scott Walker in Wisconsin, among others, are to invite the federal government to set up a health insurance exchange in their states under the law they derided as “Obamacare” not long ago.

After a hard-fought campaign against “Obamacare” during elections, many Republican governors, including Indian-American Bobby Jindal, are reluctantly opening the door to the controversial legislation, aimed at reducing the overall costs of health care in the US. Jindal, the Indian-American governor of Louisiana, in Texas, in Ohio and in Wisconsin, among others, are to invite the to set up a health insurance exchange in their states under the law they derided as “Obamacare” not long ago.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care.

"These Republican governors, and more than a dozen others in red states around the country, have decided it's better to have 'Obamacare' forced on them than to legitimise it by setting up their own exchanges, even if that means empowering the federal government at the expense of the states," the Politico said.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called 'Obamacare', is aimed primarily at decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care. It provides a number of mechanisms, including mandates, subsidies, and tax credits—to employers and individuals in order to increase the coverage rate.

Jindal, 41, a health policy expert by trade, was quoted by the Huffington Post as saying that while he's not going to set up an exchange, he hopes that Obama's second term will bring more cooperation between the federal government and the states on a range of health care issues.

"We are certainly going to go to the president and give him a chance to actually be bipartisan and give him a chance to give us the flexibility to bring more market-based competition and ideas into health care programmes, and I hope he'll work with us to do that," Jindal said.

It's a stick in the eye of a just re-elected President, whose healthcare plan is still opposed by about half the country and an indication that some have no intention of backing down just because President won another four years. By Friday, 19 states had indicated they would let the federal government run their exchanges, most of which went to Mitt Romney on Election Day.

Another 11 states were officially undeclared, while 20 states and the District of Columbia had announced they would set up exchanges partially or fully run by their states. The Republican governors of several big states, including Florida's Rick Scott, New Jersey's and Arizona's Jan Brewer, remain in the undecided column.

That may have factored into federal health officials' decision to postpone Friday's planned deadline for signing up until mid-December. The Republican Governors Association had asked for the extension and applauded it when it was announced on Thursday.

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