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US to initiate action against India-based printer for fraud

In order to collect thes e benefits, letters say recipients need only send in a small amount of money for processing fee or taxes

The will initiate actions against host of global companies and individuals, including those in India, involved in mass mailing schemes that have collectively defrauded millions of elderly and vulnerable victims running into hundreds of millions of dollars.

According to the Justice Department, fraudulent "direct mailers" create letters falsely claiming that the recipient has won, or will soon win, cash or valuable prizes, or otherwise will come into good fortune.

In order to collect these benefits, the letters say that the recipients need only send in a small amount of money for a processing or taxes.

The letters appear to come from legitimate sources, typically on official-looking letterhead, and — even though they are in reality identical form letters — the letters appear to be personally addressed.

Some solicitations even use fonts that appear to be handwritten, it said.

Among others, the complaint names Mail Order Solutions Pvt Ltd. (MOSI), an India-based printer and distributor, and its principals, Dharti Desai, 49, of New York County and Mumbai, India, and Mehul Desai, also of Mumbai.

As alleged in the complaint, MOSI and its principals have served as one of BDK's printer/distributors since at least 2005.

MOSI designs, edits and proofreads BDK's solicitations, then "lettershops" them (folds, inserts and seals the various printed elements of the solicitations into mailing envelopes).

MOSI prepares the letters for entry into the mail either as air freight to JFK (or another airport) for delivery to a domestic mailing house, or by shipping the letters to Singapore, Fiji or Hungary for introduction via the foreign post.

The complaint alleges that since 2013, MOSI has shipped at least 24.5 million solicitation packets to the US, the Department of Justice said.

The initiated by the Department of Justice sought to shut down several actors who work with the mailers to carry out these schemes.

These included an India-based printer that manufactures the solicitations and arranges for bulk shipment to victims; list brokers who buy, sell or rent lists of victims from one mailer to another so that once a victim has fallen prey to one scheme, are able to target this victim; and a Canadian payment processor that, for more than 20 years, has helped dozens of fraudsters gain access to banks and take money from victims.

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Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

US to initiate action against India-based printer for fraud

In order to collect thes e benefits, letters say recipients need only send in a small amount of money for processing fee or taxes

Press Trust of India  |  Washington 

US Flag  Photo: Wikipedia
US Flag Photo: Wikipedia

The will initiate actions against host of global companies and individuals, including those in India, involved in mass mailing schemes that have collectively defrauded millions of elderly and vulnerable victims running into hundreds of millions of dollars.

According to the Justice Department, fraudulent "direct mailers" create letters falsely claiming that the recipient has won, or will soon win, cash or valuable prizes, or otherwise will come into good fortune.

In order to collect these benefits, the letters say that the recipients need only send in a small amount of money for a processing or taxes.

The letters appear to come from legitimate sources, typically on official-looking letterhead, and — even though they are in reality identical form letters — the letters appear to be personally addressed.

Some solicitations even use fonts that appear to be handwritten, it said.

Among others, the complaint names Mail Order Solutions Pvt Ltd. (MOSI), an India-based printer and distributor, and its principals, Dharti Desai, 49, of New York County and Mumbai, India, and Mehul Desai, also of Mumbai.

As alleged in the complaint, MOSI and its principals have served as one of BDK's printer/distributors since at least 2005.

MOSI designs, edits and proofreads BDK's solicitations, then "lettershops" them (folds, inserts and seals the various printed elements of the solicitations into mailing envelopes).

MOSI prepares the letters for entry into the mail either as air freight to JFK (or another airport) for delivery to a domestic mailing house, or by shipping the letters to Singapore, Fiji or Hungary for introduction via the foreign post.

The complaint alleges that since 2013, MOSI has shipped at least 24.5 million solicitation packets to the US, the Department of Justice said.

The initiated by the Department of Justice sought to shut down several actors who work with the mailers to carry out these schemes.

These included an India-based printer that manufactures the solicitations and arranges for bulk shipment to victims; list brokers who buy, sell or rent lists of victims from one mailer to another so that once a victim has fallen prey to one scheme, are able to target this victim; and a Canadian payment processor that, for more than 20 years, has helped dozens of fraudsters gain access to banks and take money from victims.

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US to initiate action against India-based printer for fraud

In order to collect thes e benefits, letters say recipients need only send in a small amount of money for processing fee or taxes

In order to collect these benefits, letters say recipients need only send in a small amount of money for processing fee or taxes
The will initiate actions against host of global companies and individuals, including those in India, involved in mass mailing schemes that have collectively defrauded millions of elderly and vulnerable victims running into hundreds of millions of dollars.

According to the Justice Department, fraudulent "direct mailers" create letters falsely claiming that the recipient has won, or will soon win, cash or valuable prizes, or otherwise will come into good fortune.

In order to collect these benefits, the letters say that the recipients need only send in a small amount of money for a processing or taxes.

The letters appear to come from legitimate sources, typically on official-looking letterhead, and — even though they are in reality identical form letters — the letters appear to be personally addressed.

Some solicitations even use fonts that appear to be handwritten, it said.

Among others, the complaint names Mail Order Solutions Pvt Ltd. (MOSI), an India-based printer and distributor, and its principals, Dharti Desai, 49, of New York County and Mumbai, India, and Mehul Desai, also of Mumbai.

As alleged in the complaint, MOSI and its principals have served as one of BDK's printer/distributors since at least 2005.

MOSI designs, edits and proofreads BDK's solicitations, then "lettershops" them (folds, inserts and seals the various printed elements of the solicitations into mailing envelopes).

MOSI prepares the letters for entry into the mail either as air freight to JFK (or another airport) for delivery to a domestic mailing house, or by shipping the letters to Singapore, Fiji or Hungary for introduction via the foreign post.

The complaint alleges that since 2013, MOSI has shipped at least 24.5 million solicitation packets to the US, the Department of Justice said.

The initiated by the Department of Justice sought to shut down several actors who work with the mailers to carry out these schemes.

These included an India-based printer that manufactures the solicitations and arranges for bulk shipment to victims; list brokers who buy, sell or rent lists of victims from one mailer to another so that once a victim has fallen prey to one scheme, are able to target this victim; and a Canadian payment processor that, for more than 20 years, has helped dozens of fraudsters gain access to banks and take money from victims.
image
Business Standard
177 22

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