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Central Silk Board draws up plan to promote Eri, Tussar silk

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The (CSB), under the ministry of textiles, has drawn up a plan to promote cultivation of Tussar and Eri silk varieties in the central and eastern states. The CSB has jointly mooted the proposal with the Ministry of Rural Development (MoRD) to implement the scheme during the current financial year.

“Silk is an essential item to achieve inclusive growth. It is a secondary occupation in major growing states like Karnataka. We have prepared a programme for the promotion of lesser-known varieties like Eri and Tussar in some of the Naxal-affected areas in Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha and Andhra Pradesh. We would roll out the programme in two months in these states,” Ishita Roy, member secretary & chief executive officer, Central Silk Board, said.

Tussar (Tussah) is copperish coloured, coarse silk, mainly used for furnishings and interiors. It’s produced in Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Orissa, Maharashtra, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. Eri is a multivoltine silk spun from open-ended cocoons. Eri silk is the product of the domesticated silkworm. Ericulture is practiced for pupae, a delicacy for tribals. It is used for making chaddars for use by the tribals. This culture is practiced in Bihar, West Bengal and Orissa.

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Central Silk Board draws up plan to promote Eri, Tussar silk

The Central Silk Board (CSB), under the ministry of textiles, has drawn up a plan to promote cultivation of Tussar and Eri silk varieties in the central and eastern states. The CSB has jointly mooted the proposal with the Ministry of Rural Development (MoRD) to implement the scheme during the current financial year.

The (CSB), under the ministry of textiles, has drawn up a plan to promote cultivation of Tussar and Eri silk varieties in the central and eastern states. The CSB has jointly mooted the proposal with the Ministry of Rural Development (MoRD) to implement the scheme during the current financial year.

“Silk is an essential item to achieve inclusive growth. It is a secondary occupation in major growing states like Karnataka. We have prepared a programme for the promotion of lesser-known varieties like Eri and Tussar in some of the Naxal-affected areas in Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha and Andhra Pradesh. We would roll out the programme in two months in these states,” Ishita Roy, member secretary & chief executive officer, Central Silk Board, said.

Tussar (Tussah) is copperish coloured, coarse silk, mainly used for furnishings and interiors. It’s produced in Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Orissa, Maharashtra, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. Eri is a multivoltine silk spun from open-ended cocoons. Eri silk is the product of the domesticated silkworm. Ericulture is practiced for pupae, a delicacy for tribals. It is used for making chaddars for use by the tribals. This culture is practiced in Bihar, West Bengal and Orissa.

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