Weak outlook for the rupee

The has begun 2012 on a note that suggests there will be as many trading opportunities as in 2011. In the first five weeks, the gained eight-nine per cent against the dollar, euro, and yen. It's moved from a low of nearly Rs 54/ to a recent high of Rs 48.6. At an average futures leverage of 50:1 that's tasty for any trader who got the trend right.

The correlation of rupee's gyrations with foreign institutional investors (FII) attitude is apparent. In that same five-week period, portfolio investors made net buys of $3 billion of Indian equity and also bought $3.4 billion of debt, mostly treasury bills. If foreigners stay positive on India, the inflows could push the up even further, to test resistance at Rs 46.5.

Several situations could affect the current uptrend. One is a collapse in the zone if Greece defaults or there is trouble in Spain, France, Portugal, Italy, etc. That would probably lead to the hardening versus the euro, as investors flee to the safety of US treasury bills. The would weaken against the but strengthen versus the euro.

Another interesting situation could arise if India's forex-denominated corporate debt such as and require refinancing and redemption in rupees. This would probably drive the down again if there is major redemption pressure.

A third scenario would be a reversal of the Reserve Bank of India's (RBI's) tight monetary policy. If does cut interest rates, the first logical effect should be the weakening, as the rate-differential between the and hard-currency regimes narrows. Right now, Indian treasuries yield around four times as US T-Bills and twice as much as Chinese bonds.

rate cuts would be good for the corporate sector and cuts may induce FIIs to invest more heavily in Indian assets. I think the correlation between flows and exchange rates is stronger than the correlation of movements with respect to interest rate parity. Of course, I could be entirely wrong.

In early January, Bloomberg said two forecasters, with the most accurate records in 2011, suggested the will be at somewhere between Rs 50.5 to 51/by December 2012. Those estimates may have changed, given what happened in the next four weeks.

Technically, the dollar/looks set to see a reaction from Rs 48.7 till around the Rs 50.5 level. It's already moved down to Rs 49.4. This would imply some more selling. If you decide to play that move by going long the dollar/rupee, set a stop-loss at around Rs 49.


The author is a technical and equity analyst

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

Weak outlook for the rupee

Devangshu Datta  |  New Delhi 

The has begun 2012 on a note that suggests there will be as many trading opportunities as in 2011. In the first five weeks, the gained eight-nine per cent against the dollar, euro, and yen. It's moved from a low of nearly Rs 54/ to a recent high of Rs 48.6. At an average futures leverage of 50:1 that's tasty for any trader who got the trend right.

The correlation of rupee's gyrations with foreign institutional investors (FII) attitude is apparent. In that same five-week period, portfolio investors made net buys of $3 billion of Indian equity and also bought $3.4 billion of debt, mostly treasury bills. If foreigners stay positive on India, the inflows could push the up even further, to test resistance at Rs 46.5.

Several situations could affect the current uptrend. One is a collapse in the zone if Greece defaults or there is trouble in Spain, France, Portugal, Italy, etc. That would probably lead to the hardening versus the euro, as investors flee to the safety of US treasury bills. The would weaken against the but strengthen versus the euro.

Another interesting situation could arise if India's forex-denominated corporate debt such as and require refinancing and redemption in rupees. This would probably drive the down again if there is major redemption pressure.

A third scenario would be a reversal of the Reserve Bank of India's (RBI's) tight monetary policy. If does cut interest rates, the first logical effect should be the weakening, as the rate-differential between the and hard-currency regimes narrows. Right now, Indian treasuries yield around four times as US T-Bills and twice as much as Chinese bonds.

rate cuts would be good for the corporate sector and cuts may induce FIIs to invest more heavily in Indian assets. I think the correlation between flows and exchange rates is stronger than the correlation of movements with respect to interest rate parity. Of course, I could be entirely wrong.

In early January, Bloomberg said two forecasters, with the most accurate records in 2011, suggested the will be at somewhere between Rs 50.5 to 51/by December 2012. Those estimates may have changed, given what happened in the next four weeks.

Technically, the dollar/looks set to see a reaction from Rs 48.7 till around the Rs 50.5 level. It's already moved down to Rs 49.4. This would imply some more selling. If you decide to play that move by going long the dollar/rupee, set a stop-loss at around Rs 49.


The author is a technical and equity analyst

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Weak outlook for the rupee

The rupee has begun 2012 on a note that suggests there will be as many trading opportunities as in 2011. In the first five weeks, the rupee gained eight-nine per cent against the dollar, euro, sterling and yen. It's moved from a low of nearly Rs 54/ dollar to a recent high of Rs 48.6. At an average futures leverage of 50:1 that's tasty for any trader who got the trend right.

The has begun 2012 on a note that suggests there will be as many trading opportunities as in 2011. In the first five weeks, the gained eight-nine per cent against the dollar, euro, and yen. It's moved from a low of nearly Rs 54/ to a recent high of Rs 48.6. At an average futures leverage of 50:1 that's tasty for any trader who got the trend right.

The correlation of rupee's gyrations with foreign institutional investors (FII) attitude is apparent. In that same five-week period, portfolio investors made net buys of $3 billion of Indian equity and also bought $3.4 billion of debt, mostly treasury bills. If foreigners stay positive on India, the inflows could push the up even further, to test resistance at Rs 46.5.

Several situations could affect the current uptrend. One is a collapse in the zone if Greece defaults or there is trouble in Spain, France, Portugal, Italy, etc. That would probably lead to the hardening versus the euro, as investors flee to the safety of US treasury bills. The would weaken against the but strengthen versus the euro.

Another interesting situation could arise if India's forex-denominated corporate debt such as and require refinancing and redemption in rupees. This would probably drive the down again if there is major redemption pressure.

A third scenario would be a reversal of the Reserve Bank of India's (RBI's) tight monetary policy. If does cut interest rates, the first logical effect should be the weakening, as the rate-differential between the and hard-currency regimes narrows. Right now, Indian treasuries yield around four times as US T-Bills and twice as much as Chinese bonds.

rate cuts would be good for the corporate sector and cuts may induce FIIs to invest more heavily in Indian assets. I think the correlation between flows and exchange rates is stronger than the correlation of movements with respect to interest rate parity. Of course, I could be entirely wrong.

In early January, Bloomberg said two forecasters, with the most accurate records in 2011, suggested the will be at somewhere between Rs 50.5 to 51/by December 2012. Those estimates may have changed, given what happened in the next four weeks.

Technically, the dollar/looks set to see a reaction from Rs 48.7 till around the Rs 50.5 level. It's already moved down to Rs 49.4. This would imply some more selling. If you decide to play that move by going long the dollar/rupee, set a stop-loss at around Rs 49.


The author is a technical and equity analyst

image
Business Standard
177 22

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