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Counseling helped Prince Harry to cope with Diana's death

ANI  |  New York [USA] 

Prince Harry, the fifth in line to the throne, has revealed that he took the help of counseling for four years to cope with her mother, Princess Diana's death.

As reported by CNN, Prince Henry of Wales in an interview given to The Telegraph said that he had to endure a period of "total chaos" after losing her mother at such a young age.

"I can safely say that losing my mum at the age of 12 and therefore shutting down all of my emotions for the last 20 years has had a quite serious effect on not only my personal life but also my work as well," he said.

He also told that, at the age of 28 he took professional help after enduring "two years of total chaos. I didn't know what was wrong with me."

"My way of dealing with it was sticking my head in the sand. Refusing to ever think about my mum because why would that help? It's only going to make you sad. It's not going to bring her back."

The 32-year-old shared that it took him years to realize that he needed to confront his emotions.

"From an emotional side, I was like 'right, don't ever let your emotions be part of anything.' So, I was a typical sort of 20-, 25-, 28-year-old running around going 'life is great, or life is fine," he said.

He continued, "Then I started to have a few conversations and then, all of a sudden, all of this grief that I'd never processed came to the forefront. I was like, 'there's actually a lot of stuff here I need to deal with."

Known as the people's Princess, died in a car crash in Paris on August 31, 1997.

Her sudden death sent the whole Britain into a period of mourning.

The Princess of Wales and Prince Charles married each other in London in a lavish ceremony at St. Paul's Cathedral.

Price Harry in the interview said that his elder brother, Duke of Cambridge, Prince Williams urged him to seek some professional help.

Bit, now believes that because of the "process he have been through," said he feels he's in "a good place.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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