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Erdogan slams criticism of Turkey referendum

ANI  |  London [U.K.] 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday rejected the criticism by international monitors of a referendum, which would see the country switch from the Parliamentary to the Presidential system.

Not only does the result give him new powers as the country's head of state, but also extends his influence over the judiciary making him dominant over the Parliament.

Returning in triumph to his presidential palace in Ankara, Erdogan addressed thousands of supporters gathered outside, telling monitors who criticised the poll, "Know your place," The Guardian reports.

Erdogan said Turkey could hold further referendums on its bid and re-introducing the death penalty.

The 'Yes' camp won 51.41 percent in Sunday's referendum.

But the opposition immediately cried foul, claiming a clean vote would have made a difference of several percentage points and handed them victory.

The main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) and the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) said they would challenge the results from most ballot boxes due to alleged violations.

"There is only one decision to ease the situation in the context of the law -- the Supreme Election Board (YSK) should annul the vote," the Dogan news agency quoted CHP deputy leader Bulent Tezcan as saying.

The referendum has no "democratic legitimacy", HDP spokesman and lawmaker Osman Baydemir told reporters in Ankara.

Erdogan on Monday will chair a cabinet and security meeting at his presidential palace that could extend the nine-month state of emergency brought in after last July's failed coup.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Erdogan slams criticism of Turkey referendum

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday rejected the criticism by international monitors of a referendum, which would see the country switch from the Parliamentary to the Presidential system.Not only does the result give him new powers as the country's head of state, but also extends his influence over the judiciary making him dominant over the Parliament.Returning in triumph to his presidential palace in Ankara, Erdogan addressed thousands of supporters gathered outside, telling monitors who criticised the poll, "Know your place," The Guardian reports.Erdogan said Turkey could hold further referendums on its EU bid and re-introducing the death penalty.The 'Yes' camp won 51.41 percent in Sunday's referendum.But the opposition immediately cried foul, claiming a clean vote would have made a difference of several percentage points and handed them victory.The main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) and the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) said they would ...

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday rejected the criticism by international monitors of a referendum, which would see the country switch from the Parliamentary to the Presidential system.

Not only does the result give him new powers as the country's head of state, but also extends his influence over the judiciary making him dominant over the Parliament.

Returning in triumph to his presidential palace in Ankara, Erdogan addressed thousands of supporters gathered outside, telling monitors who criticised the poll, "Know your place," The Guardian reports.

Erdogan said Turkey could hold further referendums on its bid and re-introducing the death penalty.

The 'Yes' camp won 51.41 percent in Sunday's referendum.

But the opposition immediately cried foul, claiming a clean vote would have made a difference of several percentage points and handed them victory.

The main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) and the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) said they would challenge the results from most ballot boxes due to alleged violations.

"There is only one decision to ease the situation in the context of the law -- the Supreme Election Board (YSK) should annul the vote," the Dogan news agency quoted CHP deputy leader Bulent Tezcan as saying.

The referendum has no "democratic legitimacy", HDP spokesman and lawmaker Osman Baydemir told reporters in Ankara.

Erdogan on Monday will chair a cabinet and security meeting at his presidential palace that could extend the nine-month state of emergency brought in after last July's failed coup.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Erdogan slams criticism of Turkey referendum

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday rejected the criticism by international monitors of a referendum, which would see the country switch from the Parliamentary to the Presidential system.

Not only does the result give him new powers as the country's head of state, but also extends his influence over the judiciary making him dominant over the Parliament.

Returning in triumph to his presidential palace in Ankara, Erdogan addressed thousands of supporters gathered outside, telling monitors who criticised the poll, "Know your place," The Guardian reports.

Erdogan said Turkey could hold further referendums on its bid and re-introducing the death penalty.

The 'Yes' camp won 51.41 percent in Sunday's referendum.

But the opposition immediately cried foul, claiming a clean vote would have made a difference of several percentage points and handed them victory.

The main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) and the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) said they would challenge the results from most ballot boxes due to alleged violations.

"There is only one decision to ease the situation in the context of the law -- the Supreme Election Board (YSK) should annul the vote," the Dogan news agency quoted CHP deputy leader Bulent Tezcan as saying.

The referendum has no "democratic legitimacy", HDP spokesman and lawmaker Osman Baydemir told reporters in Ankara.

Erdogan on Monday will chair a cabinet and security meeting at his presidential palace that could extend the nine-month state of emergency brought in after last July's failed coup.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22