Improving communication in diabetes treatment of older patients yields dramatic results

More than a quarter of people over the age of 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed

A study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in The Lancet found that 27 percent achieved better glycaemic control through individualised care alone.

At the moment, patients over the age of 70 are treated using a blanket method of aggressively reducing blood glucose levels, but that does little to take their complex needs into account.

"People over the age of 70 are more likely to have multiple complications, such as heart disease, as well as type 2 diabetes. Yet perversely, these patients have so far been excluded from clinical trials, precisely because of these complications. It means they are generally treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' approach," Dr David Strain, from the University of Exeter Medical School, who led the study, said.

"We found that simply by individualising goals and setting realistic targets, then spending time talking to patients rather than aggressively chasing targets resulted in nearly a quarter of patients achieving better glycaemic control, without the need for medication," he added.

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults. The number of people over the age of 65 has grown worldwide, and could now be as high as one in five. Older patients are more susceptible to complications caused by hyperglycaemia, when blood sugar levels are not properly balanced. These complications can increase the risk of falls and dizziness.

The situation has led to calls for treatment to be individualised, but so far evidence to support the case has been lacking.

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

Improving communication in diabetes treatment of older patients yields dramatic results

ANI  |  London 

More than a quarter of people over the age of 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed

A study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in The Lancet found that 27 percent achieved better glycaemic control through individualised care alone.

At the moment, patients over the age of 70 are treated using a blanket method of aggressively reducing blood glucose levels, but that does little to take their complex needs into account.

"People over the age of 70 are more likely to have multiple complications, such as heart disease, as well as type 2 diabetes. Yet perversely, these patients have so far been excluded from clinical trials, precisely because of these complications. It means they are generally treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' approach," Dr David Strain, from the University of Exeter Medical School, who led the study, said.

"We found that simply by individualising goals and setting realistic targets, then spending time talking to patients rather than aggressively chasing targets resulted in nearly a quarter of patients achieving better glycaemic control, without the need for medication," he added.

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults. The number of people over the age of 65 has grown worldwide, and could now be as high as one in five. Older patients are more susceptible to complications caused by hyperglycaemia, when blood sugar levels are not properly balanced. These complications can increase the risk of falls and dizziness.

The situation has led to calls for treatment to be individualised, but so far evidence to support the case has been lacking.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Improving communication in diabetes treatment of older patients yields dramatic results

More than a quarter of people over the age of 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealedA study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in The Lancet found that 27 percent achieved better glycaemic control through individualised care alone.At the moment, patients over the age of 70 are treated using a blanket method of aggressively reducing blood glucose levels, but that does little to take their complex needs into account."People over the age of 70 are more likely to have multiple complications, such as heart disease, as well as type 2 diabetes. Yet perversely, these patients have so far been excluded from clinical trials, precisely because of these complications. It means they are generally treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' approach," Dr David Strain, from the University of Exeter Medical School, who led the study, said."We found that simply by individualising goals and ...

More than a quarter of people over the age of 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed

A study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in The Lancet found that 27 percent achieved better glycaemic control through individualised care alone.

At the moment, patients over the age of 70 are treated using a blanket method of aggressively reducing blood glucose levels, but that does little to take their complex needs into account.

"People over the age of 70 are more likely to have multiple complications, such as heart disease, as well as type 2 diabetes. Yet perversely, these patients have so far been excluded from clinical trials, precisely because of these complications. It means they are generally treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' approach," Dr David Strain, from the University of Exeter Medical School, who led the study, said.

"We found that simply by individualising goals and setting realistic targets, then spending time talking to patients rather than aggressively chasing targets resulted in nearly a quarter of patients achieving better glycaemic control, without the need for medication," he added.

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults. The number of people over the age of 65 has grown worldwide, and could now be as high as one in five. Older patients are more susceptible to complications caused by hyperglycaemia, when blood sugar levels are not properly balanced. These complications can increase the risk of falls and dizziness.

The situation has led to calls for treatment to be individualised, but so far evidence to support the case has been lacking.

image
Business Standard
177 22
Widgets Magazine

More News

  • Star TV Advertisers pay IPL-like rates for India-West Indies T20
  • We focused on creating value, not valuation: Bhavin Turakhia We focused on creating value, not valuation: Bhavin Turakhia
Widgets Magazine
Widgets Magazine

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard