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In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

ANI  |  Washington D.C [US] 

According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.

Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States.

"We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.

Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."

The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.

Opioids were designed to reach receptors in the brain, causing pain reduction and feelings of euphoria.

For their vaccine, the researchers combined a signature opioid structure with a molecule to trigger an immune response. When injected, the vaccine teaches the immune system to bind to the drug molecule and remove it from circulation.

The vaccine-derived antibodies were tailored by TSRI scientists to seek out the prescription drug and block the opioid from reaching the brain, potentially depriving a person of the "reward" of consuming the drug.

The scientists believe a vaccine approach could have an advantage over current opioid addiction therapies because it would not alter brain chemistry like many of today's anti-addiction therapies do.

"The vaccine approach stops the drug before it even gets to the brain," said study co-author Cody J. Wenthur, adding it's like a preemptive strike.

The researchers found that their vaccine design blocked pain

perception of oxy/hydro use in mice.

Indeed, those given the vaccine did not display the usual symptoms of a drug high such as ignoring pain and discomfort.

In further tests, the rodents also appeared less susceptible to fatal overdose.

Although it was found that some vaccinated mice did succumb to the opioid drug's toxic effects, the researchers noted that it took much longer for the drug to impart its toxicity.

If this effect holds true in humans, the vaccine could extend the window of time for clinical assistance if overdose occurs.

The scientists also discovered that the vaccine remained effective in mice for the entire 60-day study period, and they believe it has the potential to last even longer.

This oxy/hydro vaccine is not the first ever tested, but it is the first to use a faithful representation of the opioid in its design, which prompts the remarkable efficacy seen with the TSRI vaccine.

"Our goal was to create a vaccine that mirrored the drug's natural structure. Clearly this tactic provided a broadly useful opioid deterrent," said study first author Atsushi Kimishima.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States."We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.Opioids were designed to reach receptors in the brain, causing pain reduction and feelings of euphoria.For their vaccine, the researchers combined a signature opioid structure with a molecule to trigger an immune response. When injected, the vaccine teaches the immune system to bind to the drug ...

According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.

Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States.

"We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.

Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."

The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.

Opioids were designed to reach receptors in the brain, causing pain reduction and feelings of euphoria.

For their vaccine, the researchers combined a signature opioid structure with a molecule to trigger an immune response. When injected, the vaccine teaches the immune system to bind to the drug molecule and remove it from circulation.

The vaccine-derived antibodies were tailored by TSRI scientists to seek out the prescription drug and block the opioid from reaching the brain, potentially depriving a person of the "reward" of consuming the drug.

The scientists believe a vaccine approach could have an advantage over current opioid addiction therapies because it would not alter brain chemistry like many of today's anti-addiction therapies do.

"The vaccine approach stops the drug before it even gets to the brain," said study co-author Cody J. Wenthur, adding it's like a preemptive strike.

The researchers found that their vaccine design blocked pain

perception of oxy/hydro use in mice.

Indeed, those given the vaccine did not display the usual symptoms of a drug high such as ignoring pain and discomfort.

In further tests, the rodents also appeared less susceptible to fatal overdose.

Although it was found that some vaccinated mice did succumb to the opioid drug's toxic effects, the researchers noted that it took much longer for the drug to impart its toxicity.

If this effect holds true in humans, the vaccine could extend the window of time for clinical assistance if overdose occurs.

The scientists also discovered that the vaccine remained effective in mice for the entire 60-day study period, and they believe it has the potential to last even longer.

This oxy/hydro vaccine is not the first ever tested, but it is the first to use a faithful representation of the opioid in its design, which prompts the remarkable efficacy seen with the TSRI vaccine.

"Our goal was to create a vaccine that mirrored the drug's natural structure. Clearly this tactic provided a broadly useful opioid deterrent," said study first author Atsushi Kimishima.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.

Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States.

"We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.

Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."

The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.

Opioids were designed to reach receptors in the brain, causing pain reduction and feelings of euphoria.

For their vaccine, the researchers combined a signature opioid structure with a molecule to trigger an immune response. When injected, the vaccine teaches the immune system to bind to the drug molecule and remove it from circulation.

The vaccine-derived antibodies were tailored by TSRI scientists to seek out the prescription drug and block the opioid from reaching the brain, potentially depriving a person of the "reward" of consuming the drug.

The scientists believe a vaccine approach could have an advantage over current opioid addiction therapies because it would not alter brain chemistry like many of today's anti-addiction therapies do.

"The vaccine approach stops the drug before it even gets to the brain," said study co-author Cody J. Wenthur, adding it's like a preemptive strike.

The researchers found that their vaccine design blocked pain

perception of oxy/hydro use in mice.

Indeed, those given the vaccine did not display the usual symptoms of a drug high such as ignoring pain and discomfort.

In further tests, the rodents also appeared less susceptible to fatal overdose.

Although it was found that some vaccinated mice did succumb to the opioid drug's toxic effects, the researchers noted that it took much longer for the drug to impart its toxicity.

If this effect holds true in humans, the vaccine could extend the window of time for clinical assistance if overdose occurs.

The scientists also discovered that the vaccine remained effective in mice for the entire 60-day study period, and they believe it has the potential to last even longer.

This oxy/hydro vaccine is not the first ever tested, but it is the first to use a faithful representation of the opioid in its design, which prompts the remarkable efficacy seen with the TSRI vaccine.

"Our goal was to create a vaccine that mirrored the drug's natural structure. Clearly this tactic provided a broadly useful opioid deterrent," said study first author Atsushi Kimishima.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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