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Overweight boys at high risk of colon cancer: Study

ANI  |  Washington D.C. [USA] 

In an attempt to highlight the importance of children to be a healthy, a recent study suggests overweight boys, as compared to their slimmer friends, are at greater risk of colon (bowel)

The new research was presented at this year's European on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal.

However, overweight boys who shed the pounds and achieve a healthy weight by young adulthood do not appear to be at increased risk of colon as adults.

Colon is the 4th most common in adults, with around 41,000 cases diagnosed each year in the Previous research shows that overweight children are at higher risk of colon as adults, but it is unclear whether changes in body mass index (BMI) between childhood and young adulthood alter this risk.

In this study, Dr Britt Wang Jensen and Associate Professor Jennifer Baker from Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, and colleagues analysed the records of over 61,000 Danish school boys born between 1939 and 1959, to examine how changes in BMI in childhood and young adulthood are associated with colon risk in adulthood.

Participants' weight and height were measured at age 7 years and in young adulthood (age 17-26 years) and BMI was calculated. These young men were then linked with the Danish Register and followed from the age of 40 years to identify cases of colon

During an average (median) 25-year follow-up, more than 700 boys went on to develop colon Analyses showed that boys who were overweight (BMI greater than 17.88 kg/m2) at age 7 years but normal weight (BMI under 25.0 kg/m2) as young men had similar risk of adult colon as those who maintained a stable, healthy weight throughout.

In contrast, overweight boys who remained overweight as young men had twice the colon risk. The study took educational level into account but not lifestyle factors that might contribute to a person's risk of developing

The authors conclude: "Overweight boys that lose weight and achieve a normal-weight status by young adulthood do not carry an increased risk of adult colon compared with boys who remain normal-weight as young men. However, overweight boys who remain overweight as young men have an increased risk of adult colon These results highlight the importance of weight management in childhood."

They add: "Our next steps are to expand our focus and examine other forms of along with other non-communicable diseases to create a full picture of how a man's weight development across his life, even from birth, is associated with his risk of disease.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Sat, May 20 2017. 12:22 IST
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