Business Standard

Assam celebrates Magh Bihu with traditional fervour

IANS  |  Guwahati 

on Saturday celebrated Magh Bihu with traditional fervour along with the burning of a religious bonfire (meiji).

Although the 'Magh' month starts from January 15 (Sunday), Bihu festivities begin from the last day of the 'Puh' of the Assamese calendar.

'Uruka' or the day of the grand feast, which people celebrate with family and friends, was marked on Friday night.

On Saturday morning, people across the state set fire to meiji and offered prayers to the fire God.

The lighting of the meiji is performed by the elders of the family.

The Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu marks the harvest festival in and the festivities continue for more than a week.

People visit friends and family where they are served different traditional food items including laru (laddu), pitha (rice cakes), flattened rice with curd and jaggery.

Markets in different parts of the state remained busy since Friday morning with people from different walks of life vying for the best of the fresh produce.

Marking the festival, traditional sports are also played by all.

"We have organised traditional sports like 'Rosi tona' (Tug of war) among the women and children of our locality. The basic idea is just to make the day full of fun and give the people of the area a break. It went off well and everyone enjoyed," said Rajesh Bharali of Guwahati's Kalapahar area.

Likewise many other localities also organised singing and art competitions among the kids to fill the day with fun.

However, the festival's major attractions of bulbul bird and buffalo fights at Haigriva Madhav Temple at Hajo near Guwahati and at Ahatguri in Morigaon district, were amiss this year due to a ban by the Supreme Court.

"It's a history and a cultural legacy of the people of Hajo to organise the bulbul fights. However, we would not to hold the event due to the apex court's ban," said Head administrator of the Haigriva Madhav temple, Shiva Prasad Sarma.

--IANS

ah/ksk/bg

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Assam celebrates Magh Bihu with traditional fervour

Assam on Saturday celebrated Magh Bihu with traditional fervour along with the burning of a religious bonfire (meiji).

on Saturday celebrated Magh Bihu with traditional fervour along with the burning of a religious bonfire (meiji).

Although the 'Magh' month starts from January 15 (Sunday), Bihu festivities begin from the last day of the 'Puh' of the Assamese calendar.

'Uruka' or the day of the grand feast, which people celebrate with family and friends, was marked on Friday night.

On Saturday morning, people across the state set fire to meiji and offered prayers to the fire God.

The lighting of the meiji is performed by the elders of the family.

The Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu marks the harvest festival in and the festivities continue for more than a week.

People visit friends and family where they are served different traditional food items including laru (laddu), pitha (rice cakes), flattened rice with curd and jaggery.

Markets in different parts of the state remained busy since Friday morning with people from different walks of life vying for the best of the fresh produce.

Marking the festival, traditional sports are also played by all.

"We have organised traditional sports like 'Rosi tona' (Tug of war) among the women and children of our locality. The basic idea is just to make the day full of fun and give the people of the area a break. It went off well and everyone enjoyed," said Rajesh Bharali of Guwahati's Kalapahar area.

Likewise many other localities also organised singing and art competitions among the kids to fill the day with fun.

However, the festival's major attractions of bulbul bird and buffalo fights at Haigriva Madhav Temple at Hajo near Guwahati and at Ahatguri in Morigaon district, were amiss this year due to a ban by the Supreme Court.

"It's a history and a cultural legacy of the people of Hajo to organise the bulbul fights. However, we would not to hold the event due to the apex court's ban," said Head administrator of the Haigriva Madhav temple, Shiva Prasad Sarma.

--IANS

ah/ksk/bg

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Assam celebrates Magh Bihu with traditional fervour

on Saturday celebrated Magh Bihu with traditional fervour along with the burning of a religious bonfire (meiji).

Although the 'Magh' month starts from January 15 (Sunday), Bihu festivities begin from the last day of the 'Puh' of the Assamese calendar.

'Uruka' or the day of the grand feast, which people celebrate with family and friends, was marked on Friday night.

On Saturday morning, people across the state set fire to meiji and offered prayers to the fire God.

The lighting of the meiji is performed by the elders of the family.

The Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu marks the harvest festival in and the festivities continue for more than a week.

People visit friends and family where they are served different traditional food items including laru (laddu), pitha (rice cakes), flattened rice with curd and jaggery.

Markets in different parts of the state remained busy since Friday morning with people from different walks of life vying for the best of the fresh produce.

Marking the festival, traditional sports are also played by all.

"We have organised traditional sports like 'Rosi tona' (Tug of war) among the women and children of our locality. The basic idea is just to make the day full of fun and give the people of the area a break. It went off well and everyone enjoyed," said Rajesh Bharali of Guwahati's Kalapahar area.

Likewise many other localities also organised singing and art competitions among the kids to fill the day with fun.

However, the festival's major attractions of bulbul bird and buffalo fights at Haigriva Madhav Temple at Hajo near Guwahati and at Ahatguri in Morigaon district, were amiss this year due to a ban by the Supreme Court.

"It's a history and a cultural legacy of the people of Hajo to organise the bulbul fights. However, we would not to hold the event due to the apex court's ban," said Head administrator of the Haigriva Madhav temple, Shiva Prasad Sarma.

--IANS

ah/ksk/bg

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22