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Bob Dylan performs in Las Vegas, makes no mention of Nobel Prize

IANS  |  Las Vegas 

US singer Bob Dylan, who has won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, barely spoke to the audience on Thursday night about the coveted prize during his first public performance since the announcement.

While the audience cheered on for more songs during Dylan's performance, the 75-year-old legend just gave a brief encore, ending his set with a mournful yet playful cover of Frank Sinatra's "Why try to change me now", reported theguardian.com.

Dylan found stardom when his songs -- especially "The Times They Are A-Changin'" -- became anthems in the 1960s, encapsulating the atmosphere of protest and change that surrounded the civil rights movement as well as the campaign to end the war in Vietnam.

Over the span of his 50-year career, Dylan has sold over 100 million records, and was even given a special citation by the Pulitzer Prize Committee in 2008, theguardian.com said.

He is the first musician ever to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the first American to pick up the prize since novelist Toni Morrison, author of the novels Jazz, Song of Solomon, and Beloved, who won in 1993.

--IANS

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(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Bob Dylan performs in Las Vegas, makes no mention of Nobel Prize

US singer Bob Dylan, who has won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, barely spoke to the audience on Thursday night about the coveted prize during his first public performance since the announcement.

US singer Bob Dylan, who has won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, barely spoke to the audience on Thursday night about the coveted prize during his first public performance since the announcement.

While the audience cheered on for more songs during Dylan's performance, the 75-year-old legend just gave a brief encore, ending his set with a mournful yet playful cover of Frank Sinatra's "Why try to change me now", reported theguardian.com.

Dylan found stardom when his songs -- especially "The Times They Are A-Changin'" -- became anthems in the 1960s, encapsulating the atmosphere of protest and change that surrounded the civil rights movement as well as the campaign to end the war in Vietnam.

Over the span of his 50-year career, Dylan has sold over 100 million records, and was even given a special citation by the Pulitzer Prize Committee in 2008, theguardian.com said.

He is the first musician ever to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the first American to pick up the prize since novelist Toni Morrison, author of the novels Jazz, Song of Solomon, and Beloved, who won in 1993.

--IANS

sas/rb/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Bob Dylan performs in Las Vegas, makes no mention of Nobel Prize

US singer Bob Dylan, who has won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, barely spoke to the audience on Thursday night about the coveted prize during his first public performance since the announcement.

While the audience cheered on for more songs during Dylan's performance, the 75-year-old legend just gave a brief encore, ending his set with a mournful yet playful cover of Frank Sinatra's "Why try to change me now", reported theguardian.com.

Dylan found stardom when his songs -- especially "The Times They Are A-Changin'" -- became anthems in the 1960s, encapsulating the atmosphere of protest and change that surrounded the civil rights movement as well as the campaign to end the war in Vietnam.

Over the span of his 50-year career, Dylan has sold over 100 million records, and was even given a special citation by the Pulitzer Prize Committee in 2008, theguardian.com said.

He is the first musician ever to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the first American to pick up the prize since novelist Toni Morrison, author of the novels Jazz, Song of Solomon, and Beloved, who won in 1993.

--IANS

sas/rb/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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