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China-India sculpture exhibition opens

IANS  |  Hangzhou (China) 

An exhibition of Chinese and Indian sculptures dating from 400 to 700 A.D. opened on Thursday in the eastern province of Zhejiang.

The three-month exhibition includes 56 sculptures from nine Indian museums and 86 sculptures from 18 Chinese museums, reports Xinhua news agency.

The period from 400 to 700 A.D. was when eminent Chinese monks Faxian, Yijing and Xuanzang travelled west to collect Buddhist scriptures. It was Xuanzang, a monk during China's Tang Dynasty (618-907), who first translated the current Chinese version of the name of

Indian artworks were spread across southeast Asia and during this period.

A Buddhist sculpture on display has the Chinese characters for as an inscription on the back. This shows that the statue was made after Xuanzang returned from his pilgrimage, said Wang Yanjia from the Palace Museum in Beijing.

The sculpture was unearthed in Xi'an, capital of northwest China's Shaanxi province, in 1954.

Another sculpture discovered in east China's Shandong province has a similar style to an Indian sculpture, indicating the exchange at art techniques during ancient times.

The exhibition is hosted by the Zhejiang Provincial Museum, the Palace Museum and the National Museum of

--IANS

mr/

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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China-India sculpture exhibition opens

An exhibition of Chinese and Indian sculptures dating from 400 to 700 A.D. opened on Thursday in the eastern province of Zhejiang.

An exhibition of Chinese and Indian sculptures dating from 400 to 700 A.D. opened on Thursday in the eastern province of Zhejiang.

The three-month exhibition includes 56 sculptures from nine Indian museums and 86 sculptures from 18 Chinese museums, reports Xinhua news agency.

The period from 400 to 700 A.D. was when eminent Chinese monks Faxian, Yijing and Xuanzang travelled west to collect Buddhist scriptures. It was Xuanzang, a monk during China's Tang Dynasty (618-907), who first translated the current Chinese version of the name of

Indian artworks were spread across southeast Asia and during this period.

A Buddhist sculpture on display has the Chinese characters for as an inscription on the back. This shows that the statue was made after Xuanzang returned from his pilgrimage, said Wang Yanjia from the Palace Museum in Beijing.

The sculpture was unearthed in Xi'an, capital of northwest China's Shaanxi province, in 1954.

Another sculpture discovered in east China's Shandong province has a similar style to an Indian sculpture, indicating the exchange at art techniques during ancient times.

The exhibition is hosted by the Zhejiang Provincial Museum, the Palace Museum and the National Museum of

--IANS

mr/

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

China-India sculpture exhibition opens

An exhibition of Chinese and Indian sculptures dating from 400 to 700 A.D. opened on Thursday in the eastern province of Zhejiang.

The three-month exhibition includes 56 sculptures from nine Indian museums and 86 sculptures from 18 Chinese museums, reports Xinhua news agency.

The period from 400 to 700 A.D. was when eminent Chinese monks Faxian, Yijing and Xuanzang travelled west to collect Buddhist scriptures. It was Xuanzang, a monk during China's Tang Dynasty (618-907), who first translated the current Chinese version of the name of

Indian artworks were spread across southeast Asia and during this period.

A Buddhist sculpture on display has the Chinese characters for as an inscription on the back. This shows that the statue was made after Xuanzang returned from his pilgrimage, said Wang Yanjia from the Palace Museum in Beijing.

The sculpture was unearthed in Xi'an, capital of northwest China's Shaanxi province, in 1954.

Another sculpture discovered in east China's Shandong province has a similar style to an Indian sculpture, indicating the exchange at art techniques during ancient times.

The exhibition is hosted by the Zhejiang Provincial Museum, the Palace Museum and the National Museum of

--IANS

mr/

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22