Business Standard

Facebook clarifies how it collects data when you're logged out

IANS  |  San Francisco 

After testified in front of the US Congress last week, the company on Tuesday tried to clarify on questions how it collects data when people are not directly using the website or app.

Many websites and apps use services to make their content and ads more engaging and relevant.

"Apps and websites that use our services, such as the Like button or Analytics, send us information to make their content and ads better," David Baser, at Facebook, wrote in a blog post.

In return for that information, helps those websites serve up relevant ads or receive analytics that help them understand how people use their services.

"When you visit a site or app that uses our services, we receive information even if you're logged out or don't have a account. This is because other apps and sites don't know who is using Facebook," Baser added.

Many companies offer these types of services and, like Facebook, they also get information from the apps and sites that use them.

"Twitter, and all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, and all offer login features," said.

These companies -- and many others -- also offer

When you visit a website, your browser (for example Chrome, Safari or Firefox) sends a request to the site's server.

The browser shares your IP address so the website knows where on the Internet to send the site content.

The website also gets information about the browser and (for example or Windows) you're using because not all browsers and devices support the same features.

"It also gets cookies, which are identifiers that websites use to know if you've visited before. This can help with things like saving items in your shopping cart," explained.

"So when a website uses one of our services, your browser sends the same kind of information to as the website receives. We also get information about which website or app you're using, which is necessary to know when to provide our tools," Baser noted.

There are three main ways in which uses the information it gets from other websites and apps.

"Providing our services to these sites or apps; improving safety and security on Facebook; and enhancing our own products and services," Baser said.

"We also use the information we receive from websites and apps to help protect the security of For example, receiving data about the sites a particular browser has visited can help us identify bad actors," he posted.

Zuckerberg, appearing before the US Congress last week, told the lawmakers that his own personal data was part of 87 million users' that was "improperly shared" with British political consultancy firm

"We don't sell the data. We use the data that people put into the system in order to make them more relevant. I believe people own their content," he told the US Congress.

is embroiled in a widening scandal that a British data firm called improperly gathered detailed information on its 87 million users.

--IANS

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(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Tue, April 17 2018. 09:50 IST
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