You are here: Home » News-IANS » Lifestyle-Fashion
Business Standard

Fathers boost daughters' maths, sons' language skills

IANS  |  New Delhi 

A father's love can have a special influence on young adults, while it can boost the maths grades of the teenage daughter, it may improve the language skills in the son, researchers said.

The study found that fathers from low-income families support their teenagers in ways that result in greater optimism, self-efficacy, and, ultimately, higher achievement at school.

This is even true for men with low levels of education or those who were not proficient enough in English to help their children with their homework.

"Low-income fathers affect their adolescents' beliefs about themselves and their future, and these beliefs influence their achievement by increasing their determination...," said Marie-Anne Suizzo from the University of Texas in the US.

These positive effects extend to both sons and daughters, albeit in different ways, the study said.

Experiencing their father's warmth first influences daughters' sense of optimism and then spills over into their feeling more determined and certain about their academic abilities. This in turn leads to better math grades.

There is a more direct link between the father's involvement and teenage boy's belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front.

Fathers' involvement with teenage boys' belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front, results in heightened self-confidence and their success in English language, arts classes, the researchers explained.

Counselors and educators should encourage fathers to communicate warmth and acceptance to their children, because of the positive influence these emotions have on their well-being, Suizzo suggested.

In the study, published in the journal Sex Roles, the team analysed 183 sixth-graders from low-income, ethnic minority families. They asked about how optimistic and motivated they were about their schoolwork, and how their experiences were with their fathers.

--IANS

rt/in/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Fathers boost daughters' maths, sons' language skills

A father's love can have a special influence on young adults, while it can boost the maths grades of the teenage daughter, it may improve the language skills in the son, researchers said.

A father's love can have a special influence on young adults, while it can boost the maths grades of the teenage daughter, it may improve the language skills in the son, researchers said.

The study found that fathers from low-income families support their teenagers in ways that result in greater optimism, self-efficacy, and, ultimately, higher achievement at school.

This is even true for men with low levels of education or those who were not proficient enough in English to help their children with their homework.

"Low-income fathers affect their adolescents' beliefs about themselves and their future, and these beliefs influence their achievement by increasing their determination...," said Marie-Anne Suizzo from the University of Texas in the US.

These positive effects extend to both sons and daughters, albeit in different ways, the study said.

Experiencing their father's warmth first influences daughters' sense of optimism and then spills over into their feeling more determined and certain about their academic abilities. This in turn leads to better math grades.

There is a more direct link between the father's involvement and teenage boy's belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front.

Fathers' involvement with teenage boys' belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front, results in heightened self-confidence and their success in English language, arts classes, the researchers explained.

Counselors and educators should encourage fathers to communicate warmth and acceptance to their children, because of the positive influence these emotions have on their well-being, Suizzo suggested.

In the study, published in the journal Sex Roles, the team analysed 183 sixth-graders from low-income, ethnic minority families. They asked about how optimistic and motivated they were about their schoolwork, and how their experiences were with their fathers.

--IANS

rt/in/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Fathers boost daughters' maths, sons' language skills

A father's love can have a special influence on young adults, while it can boost the maths grades of the teenage daughter, it may improve the language skills in the son, researchers said.

The study found that fathers from low-income families support their teenagers in ways that result in greater optimism, self-efficacy, and, ultimately, higher achievement at school.

This is even true for men with low levels of education or those who were not proficient enough in English to help their children with their homework.

"Low-income fathers affect their adolescents' beliefs about themselves and their future, and these beliefs influence their achievement by increasing their determination...," said Marie-Anne Suizzo from the University of Texas in the US.

These positive effects extend to both sons and daughters, albeit in different ways, the study said.

Experiencing their father's warmth first influences daughters' sense of optimism and then spills over into their feeling more determined and certain about their academic abilities. This in turn leads to better math grades.

There is a more direct link between the father's involvement and teenage boy's belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front.

Fathers' involvement with teenage boys' belief in their ability to succeed on the academic front, results in heightened self-confidence and their success in English language, arts classes, the researchers explained.

Counselors and educators should encourage fathers to communicate warmth and acceptance to their children, because of the positive influence these emotions have on their well-being, Suizzo suggested.

In the study, published in the journal Sex Roles, the team analysed 183 sixth-graders from low-income, ethnic minority families. They asked about how optimistic and motivated they were about their schoolwork, and how their experiences were with their fathers.

--IANS

rt/in/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard