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Google doodle honours scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose

IANS  |  New Delhi 

Google has celebrated the remarkable contributions of scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose, pioneer of electro-magnetic waves and inventor of an early version of wireless telecommunication, with a doodle on Wednesday -- on what would be his 158th birthday.

Widely regarded as the first modern Indian scientist, Bose was born in 1858 at Munshiganj of then Bengal Presidency of British India, now in Bangladesh.

"Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose was a master of scientific achievement with numerous accomplishments in various fields," Google said in a statement.

"Bose was to become known not only for his work in biophysics, but also his innovation in the world of radio and microwave sciences, ultimately inventing an early version of wireless telecommunication," it added.

Some scientists even believe that Bose was the real inventor of wireless, not Guglielmo Marconi.

In 1895 in Calcutta, he publicly demonstrated wireless transmission of electromagnetic waves for the first time anywhere in the world, using the waves to ring a distant bell and thereby to explode some gunpowder, according to a biography at Christ's College, University of Cambridge, where he studied natural sciences.

The Daily Chronicle of England noted in 1896 that "The inventor (J.C. Bose) has transmitted signals to a distance of nearly a mile and herein lies the first and obvious and exceedingly valuable application of this new theoretical marvel", Google added.

Bose's investigations into nature included the invention of the crescograph -- an instrument that measures movement and growth in plant life by magnifying it 10,000 times, Google said.

He went on to demonstrate the similarities between animals and plants, particularly when it came to reactions to different environmental, electrical, and chemical influences.

--IANS

gb/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Google doodle honours scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose

Google has celebrated the remarkable contributions of scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose, pioneer of electro-magnetic waves and inventor of an early version of wireless telecommunication, with a doodle on Wednesday -- on what would be his 158th birthday.

Google has celebrated the remarkable contributions of scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose, pioneer of electro-magnetic waves and inventor of an early version of wireless telecommunication, with a doodle on Wednesday -- on what would be his 158th birthday.

Widely regarded as the first modern Indian scientist, Bose was born in 1858 at Munshiganj of then Bengal Presidency of British India, now in Bangladesh.

"Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose was a master of scientific achievement with numerous accomplishments in various fields," Google said in a statement.

"Bose was to become known not only for his work in biophysics, but also his innovation in the world of radio and microwave sciences, ultimately inventing an early version of wireless telecommunication," it added.

Some scientists even believe that Bose was the real inventor of wireless, not Guglielmo Marconi.

In 1895 in Calcutta, he publicly demonstrated wireless transmission of electromagnetic waves for the first time anywhere in the world, using the waves to ring a distant bell and thereby to explode some gunpowder, according to a biography at Christ's College, University of Cambridge, where he studied natural sciences.

The Daily Chronicle of England noted in 1896 that "The inventor (J.C. Bose) has transmitted signals to a distance of nearly a mile and herein lies the first and obvious and exceedingly valuable application of this new theoretical marvel", Google added.

Bose's investigations into nature included the invention of the crescograph -- an instrument that measures movement and growth in plant life by magnifying it 10,000 times, Google said.

He went on to demonstrate the similarities between animals and plants, particularly when it came to reactions to different environmental, electrical, and chemical influences.

--IANS

gb/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Google doodle honours scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose

Google has celebrated the remarkable contributions of scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose, pioneer of electro-magnetic waves and inventor of an early version of wireless telecommunication, with a doodle on Wednesday -- on what would be his 158th birthday.

Widely regarded as the first modern Indian scientist, Bose was born in 1858 at Munshiganj of then Bengal Presidency of British India, now in Bangladesh.

"Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose was a master of scientific achievement with numerous accomplishments in various fields," Google said in a statement.

"Bose was to become known not only for his work in biophysics, but also his innovation in the world of radio and microwave sciences, ultimately inventing an early version of wireless telecommunication," it added.

Some scientists even believe that Bose was the real inventor of wireless, not Guglielmo Marconi.

In 1895 in Calcutta, he publicly demonstrated wireless transmission of electromagnetic waves for the first time anywhere in the world, using the waves to ring a distant bell and thereby to explode some gunpowder, according to a biography at Christ's College, University of Cambridge, where he studied natural sciences.

The Daily Chronicle of England noted in 1896 that "The inventor (J.C. Bose) has transmitted signals to a distance of nearly a mile and herein lies the first and obvious and exceedingly valuable application of this new theoretical marvel", Google added.

Bose's investigations into nature included the invention of the crescograph -- an instrument that measures movement and growth in plant life by magnifying it 10,000 times, Google said.

He went on to demonstrate the similarities between animals and plants, particularly when it came to reactions to different environmental, electrical, and chemical influences.

--IANS

gb/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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