You are here: Home » News-IANS » Cinema-Showbiz

I don't feel IPL is spoiling budding cricketers: Glenn McGrath

Popular Twenty20 tournaments like the Indian League (IPL) became a rage across the country as soon as they were introduced, but controversies soon followed. Legendary Australian pacer Glenn McGrath says the new format is not spoiling cricketers, but warns budding sportsmen against gloating over their success.

"I don't feel it (or BBL-Big Bash League) is spoiling budding cricketers. I think the important thing for budding cricketers is to always put in 100 per cent -- to continue to be your best, work hard, don't ever think you are at the top of your ability, you can always improve," McGrath told IANS in an email interview.

McGrath, considered one of the greatest bowlers in cricketing history, had, in an earlier interview, blamed quick money for spoiling fast bowlers across the world. Now, he thinks differently.

Whether on or off the field, the McGarth saga is inspiring. A member of all three teams that enabled Australia complete a World Cup treble, he also holds the record for the highest number of Test wickets - 563 - by a quickie (average 21.64) in the 124 Tests he played between 1993 and 2007. He also turned out in 250 ODIs, scalping 381 victims.

Now, he says he does not "miss playing cricket at all", since he has "a wonderful family which takes up most of my time, along with the McGrath Foundation in Australia".

He is busy creating a place for himself outside the field of cricket -- be it through his association with wine brand Hardy Wines, handling the MRF Pace Foundation, Chennai, or as the co-founder and president of the McGrath Foundation, a breast cancer support and education charity he founded with his first wife Jane, who died of the disease in 2008.

"Since retirement, I have been given me the opportunity to spend time with my family. I have three children, aged 16, 14 and one. That is what is really important to me. I have also done a little commentating in Australia and am part of the MRF academy in Chennai," he said.

McGrath also said that he is proud to be associated with Hardys because of its history and heritage.

"Their consistency and quality when it comes to wine-making has synergy with my cricketing career. So, it made a lot sense for me to represent them, especially in India," he said, pointing to the country's booming wine culture.

McGrath, who was inducted into ICC Hall of fame in January 2013, said: "There are more people enjoying wine in India, they are interested in exploring new things and I think wine is part of that journey."

(Sugandha Rawal can be contacted at sugandha.r@ians.in)

--IANS

sug/rb/vm/sac

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

I don't feel IPL is spoiling budding cricketers: Glenn McGrath

IANS  |  New Delhi 

Popular Twenty20 tournaments like the Indian League (IPL) became a rage across the country as soon as they were introduced, but controversies soon followed. Legendary Australian pacer Glenn McGrath says the new format is not spoiling cricketers, but warns budding sportsmen against gloating over their success.

"I don't feel it (or BBL-Big Bash League) is spoiling budding cricketers. I think the important thing for budding cricketers is to always put in 100 per cent -- to continue to be your best, work hard, don't ever think you are at the top of your ability, you can always improve," McGrath told IANS in an email interview.

McGrath, considered one of the greatest bowlers in cricketing history, had, in an earlier interview, blamed quick money for spoiling fast bowlers across the world. Now, he thinks differently.

Whether on or off the field, the McGarth saga is inspiring. A member of all three teams that enabled Australia complete a World Cup treble, he also holds the record for the highest number of Test wickets - 563 - by a quickie (average 21.64) in the 124 Tests he played between 1993 and 2007. He also turned out in 250 ODIs, scalping 381 victims.

Now, he says he does not "miss playing cricket at all", since he has "a wonderful family which takes up most of my time, along with the McGrath Foundation in Australia".

He is busy creating a place for himself outside the field of cricket -- be it through his association with wine brand Hardy Wines, handling the MRF Pace Foundation, Chennai, or as the co-founder and president of the McGrath Foundation, a breast cancer support and education charity he founded with his first wife Jane, who died of the disease in 2008.

"Since retirement, I have been given me the opportunity to spend time with my family. I have three children, aged 16, 14 and one. That is what is really important to me. I have also done a little commentating in Australia and am part of the MRF academy in Chennai," he said.

McGrath also said that he is proud to be associated with Hardys because of its history and heritage.

"Their consistency and quality when it comes to wine-making has synergy with my cricketing career. So, it made a lot sense for me to represent them, especially in India," he said, pointing to the country's booming wine culture.

McGrath, who was inducted into ICC Hall of fame in January 2013, said: "There are more people enjoying wine in India, they are interested in exploring new things and I think wine is part of that journey."

(Sugandha Rawal can be contacted at sugandha.r@ians.in)

--IANS

sug/rb/vm/sac

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

I don't feel IPL is spoiling budding cricketers: Glenn McGrath

Popular Twenty20 tournaments like the Indian Premier League (IPL) became a rage across the country as soon as they were introduced, but controversies soon followed. Legendary Australian pacer Glenn McGrath says the new format is not spoiling cricketers, but warns budding sportsmen against gloating over their success.

Popular Twenty20 tournaments like the Indian League (IPL) became a rage across the country as soon as they were introduced, but controversies soon followed. Legendary Australian pacer Glenn McGrath says the new format is not spoiling cricketers, but warns budding sportsmen against gloating over their success.

"I don't feel it (or BBL-Big Bash League) is spoiling budding cricketers. I think the important thing for budding cricketers is to always put in 100 per cent -- to continue to be your best, work hard, don't ever think you are at the top of your ability, you can always improve," McGrath told IANS in an email interview.

McGrath, considered one of the greatest bowlers in cricketing history, had, in an earlier interview, blamed quick money for spoiling fast bowlers across the world. Now, he thinks differently.

Whether on or off the field, the McGarth saga is inspiring. A member of all three teams that enabled Australia complete a World Cup treble, he also holds the record for the highest number of Test wickets - 563 - by a quickie (average 21.64) in the 124 Tests he played between 1993 and 2007. He also turned out in 250 ODIs, scalping 381 victims.

Now, he says he does not "miss playing cricket at all", since he has "a wonderful family which takes up most of my time, along with the McGrath Foundation in Australia".

He is busy creating a place for himself outside the field of cricket -- be it through his association with wine brand Hardy Wines, handling the MRF Pace Foundation, Chennai, or as the co-founder and president of the McGrath Foundation, a breast cancer support and education charity he founded with his first wife Jane, who died of the disease in 2008.

"Since retirement, I have been given me the opportunity to spend time with my family. I have three children, aged 16, 14 and one. That is what is really important to me. I have also done a little commentating in Australia and am part of the MRF academy in Chennai," he said.

McGrath also said that he is proud to be associated with Hardys because of its history and heritage.

"Their consistency and quality when it comes to wine-making has synergy with my cricketing career. So, it made a lot sense for me to represent them, especially in India," he said, pointing to the country's booming wine culture.

McGrath, who was inducted into ICC Hall of fame in January 2013, said: "There are more people enjoying wine in India, they are interested in exploring new things and I think wine is part of that journey."

(Sugandha Rawal can be contacted at sugandha.r@ians.in)

--IANS

sug/rb/vm/sac

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard