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ICC disappointed as du Plessis decides to appeal ball tampering verdict

IANS  |  Adelaide 

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is disappointed that captain Faf du Plessis has decided to appeal against the decision that found him guilty of ball tampering in the second Test against Australia.

Du Plessis was fined his entire match fee for the second Test in Hobart. But he was allowed to participate in the ongoing third Test in Adelaide.

Cricket said on Thursday that du Plessis has decided to appeal the decision, to which the responded on Friday.

"The is disappointed that Faf du Plessis has chosen not to accept the findings of Match Referee Andy Pycroft and will instead exercise his right to appeal. A judicial commissioner will now be appointed to hear the appeal at the earliest opportunity," the said in its statement.

"Mr du Plessis was found guilty of breaching Article 2.2.9 of the Code of Conduct after television footage appeared to show him applying an artificial substance to the ball during the fourth day's play in the second Test against in Hobart."

"The will wait until the completion of the appeal before making full comment, but at this stage it is important to clarify the laws of cricket. These state that a player should not use artificial substances to shine the ball. The understands that to include, but is not limited to, sunscreen, lip ice and residue from sweets."

Du Plessis was found guilty after TV footage showed him applying saliva to the ball for polishing with a sweet in his mouth. Du Plessis denied the charge.

"The does not wish to prevent players from using these substances for legitimate purposes, however, any deliberate attempt to apply such substances to the ball, as was the case here, will not be acceptable," it added.

"This will continue to be reported and the confirms that unless the laws are changed, the current practice of charging players when the evidence shows an obvious breach will continue. umpires will remind all teams of the laws as they stand."

--IANS

sam/bg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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ICC disappointed as du Plessis decides to appeal ball tampering verdict

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is disappointed that South Africa captain Faf du Plessis has decided to appeal against the decision that found him guilty of ball tampering in the second Test against Australia.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is disappointed that captain Faf du Plessis has decided to appeal against the decision that found him guilty of ball tampering in the second Test against Australia.

Du Plessis was fined his entire match fee for the second Test in Hobart. But he was allowed to participate in the ongoing third Test in Adelaide.

Cricket said on Thursday that du Plessis has decided to appeal the decision, to which the responded on Friday.

"The is disappointed that Faf du Plessis has chosen not to accept the findings of Match Referee Andy Pycroft and will instead exercise his right to appeal. A judicial commissioner will now be appointed to hear the appeal at the earliest opportunity," the said in its statement.

"Mr du Plessis was found guilty of breaching Article 2.2.9 of the Code of Conduct after television footage appeared to show him applying an artificial substance to the ball during the fourth day's play in the second Test against in Hobart."

"The will wait until the completion of the appeal before making full comment, but at this stage it is important to clarify the laws of cricket. These state that a player should not use artificial substances to shine the ball. The understands that to include, but is not limited to, sunscreen, lip ice and residue from sweets."

Du Plessis was found guilty after TV footage showed him applying saliva to the ball for polishing with a sweet in his mouth. Du Plessis denied the charge.

"The does not wish to prevent players from using these substances for legitimate purposes, however, any deliberate attempt to apply such substances to the ball, as was the case here, will not be acceptable," it added.

"This will continue to be reported and the confirms that unless the laws are changed, the current practice of charging players when the evidence shows an obvious breach will continue. umpires will remind all teams of the laws as they stand."

--IANS

sam/bg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

ICC disappointed as du Plessis decides to appeal ball tampering verdict

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is disappointed that captain Faf du Plessis has decided to appeal against the decision that found him guilty of ball tampering in the second Test against Australia.

Du Plessis was fined his entire match fee for the second Test in Hobart. But he was allowed to participate in the ongoing third Test in Adelaide.

Cricket said on Thursday that du Plessis has decided to appeal the decision, to which the responded on Friday.

"The is disappointed that Faf du Plessis has chosen not to accept the findings of Match Referee Andy Pycroft and will instead exercise his right to appeal. A judicial commissioner will now be appointed to hear the appeal at the earliest opportunity," the said in its statement.

"Mr du Plessis was found guilty of breaching Article 2.2.9 of the Code of Conduct after television footage appeared to show him applying an artificial substance to the ball during the fourth day's play in the second Test against in Hobart."

"The will wait until the completion of the appeal before making full comment, but at this stage it is important to clarify the laws of cricket. These state that a player should not use artificial substances to shine the ball. The understands that to include, but is not limited to, sunscreen, lip ice and residue from sweets."

Du Plessis was found guilty after TV footage showed him applying saliva to the ball for polishing with a sweet in his mouth. Du Plessis denied the charge.

"The does not wish to prevent players from using these substances for legitimate purposes, however, any deliberate attempt to apply such substances to the ball, as was the case here, will not be acceptable," it added.

"This will continue to be reported and the confirms that unless the laws are changed, the current practice of charging players when the evidence shows an obvious breach will continue. umpires will remind all teams of the laws as they stand."

--IANS

sam/bg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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