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India, Afghanistan to soon operate air cargo link over Pakistan

IANS  |  New Delhi 

and will operationalise in the next couple of days a dedicated air cargo link that will help increase bilateral trade hampered by their troubled ties with that disallows Indian goods along the road route.

"The freight corridor between and is on the verge of becoming a reality," External Affairs Ministry spokesman Gopal Baglay told reporters here.

The spokesman said the decision to have the "dedicated freight corridor" and overcome the difficulties between and landlocked-was taken during Afghan President Ashraf Ghani's visit to in December last year.

"The idea of establishing a dedicated air freight corridor was taken in view of the difficulties that we have on the ground in terms of connectivity between the two countries. At the moment, the idea is to try and see if this can be with a frequency of, let us say, a month or every fortnight," he said.

The road link between the two countries passes through Pakistan, which allows to send only limited amount of goods to while Indian goods are not allowed along this land route at all.

The air cargo service is aimed at giving an alterative trade link to the Indian market and take Indian goods to the war-ravaged country.

Afghan fruits, dry fruits and carpets are high in demand in and the freight corridor is likely to push the imports.

"The flight will take Indian products to and will bring products of to It will operate between Delhi and Kabul. It is likely that this may take place either over the weekend itself or very early next week."

Asked if air freighting the goods would be commercially viable, Baglay said the first flight to be run by Afghanistan's Ariana Airlines would determine the feasibility of the idea. "It is, at the end of the day, a commercial venture which is supported very strongly and very purposefully by both the governments."

He said the idea at the moment was not to operate a daily flight but perhaps once a month or every fortnight.

Baglay said the flight would use Pakistani airspace as it is a civil cargo plane and standard operating procedures, as stipulated, would be followed by flight operators.

"There are standard operating procedures for commercial flights, freight flights, cargo flights... very clearly stipulated procedures. I am sure the companies concerned are looking into it."

Baglay also said that a warm reception would be accorded to the flight when it lands in Delhi with Afghan products like dry fruits and other agro-goods.

--IANS

sar/vsc/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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India, Afghanistan to soon operate air cargo link over Pakistan

India and Afghanistan will operationalise in the next couple of days a dedicated air cargo link that will help increase bilateral trade hampered by their troubled ties with Pakistan that disallows Indian goods along the road route.

and will operationalise in the next couple of days a dedicated air cargo link that will help increase bilateral trade hampered by their troubled ties with that disallows Indian goods along the road route.

"The freight corridor between and is on the verge of becoming a reality," External Affairs Ministry spokesman Gopal Baglay told reporters here.

The spokesman said the decision to have the "dedicated freight corridor" and overcome the difficulties between and landlocked-was taken during Afghan President Ashraf Ghani's visit to in December last year.

"The idea of establishing a dedicated air freight corridor was taken in view of the difficulties that we have on the ground in terms of connectivity between the two countries. At the moment, the idea is to try and see if this can be with a frequency of, let us say, a month or every fortnight," he said.

The road link between the two countries passes through Pakistan, which allows to send only limited amount of goods to while Indian goods are not allowed along this land route at all.

The air cargo service is aimed at giving an alterative trade link to the Indian market and take Indian goods to the war-ravaged country.

Afghan fruits, dry fruits and carpets are high in demand in and the freight corridor is likely to push the imports.

"The flight will take Indian products to and will bring products of to It will operate between Delhi and Kabul. It is likely that this may take place either over the weekend itself or very early next week."

Asked if air freighting the goods would be commercially viable, Baglay said the first flight to be run by Afghanistan's Ariana Airlines would determine the feasibility of the idea. "It is, at the end of the day, a commercial venture which is supported very strongly and very purposefully by both the governments."

He said the idea at the moment was not to operate a daily flight but perhaps once a month or every fortnight.

Baglay said the flight would use Pakistani airspace as it is a civil cargo plane and standard operating procedures, as stipulated, would be followed by flight operators.

"There are standard operating procedures for commercial flights, freight flights, cargo flights... very clearly stipulated procedures. I am sure the companies concerned are looking into it."

Baglay also said that a warm reception would be accorded to the flight when it lands in Delhi with Afghan products like dry fruits and other agro-goods.

--IANS

sar/vsc/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

India, Afghanistan to soon operate air cargo link over Pakistan

and will operationalise in the next couple of days a dedicated air cargo link that will help increase bilateral trade hampered by their troubled ties with that disallows Indian goods along the road route.

"The freight corridor between and is on the verge of becoming a reality," External Affairs Ministry spokesman Gopal Baglay told reporters here.

The spokesman said the decision to have the "dedicated freight corridor" and overcome the difficulties between and landlocked-was taken during Afghan President Ashraf Ghani's visit to in December last year.

"The idea of establishing a dedicated air freight corridor was taken in view of the difficulties that we have on the ground in terms of connectivity between the two countries. At the moment, the idea is to try and see if this can be with a frequency of, let us say, a month or every fortnight," he said.

The road link between the two countries passes through Pakistan, which allows to send only limited amount of goods to while Indian goods are not allowed along this land route at all.

The air cargo service is aimed at giving an alterative trade link to the Indian market and take Indian goods to the war-ravaged country.

Afghan fruits, dry fruits and carpets are high in demand in and the freight corridor is likely to push the imports.

"The flight will take Indian products to and will bring products of to It will operate between Delhi and Kabul. It is likely that this may take place either over the weekend itself or very early next week."

Asked if air freighting the goods would be commercially viable, Baglay said the first flight to be run by Afghanistan's Ariana Airlines would determine the feasibility of the idea. "It is, at the end of the day, a commercial venture which is supported very strongly and very purposefully by both the governments."

He said the idea at the moment was not to operate a daily flight but perhaps once a month or every fortnight.

Baglay said the flight would use Pakistani airspace as it is a civil cargo plane and standard operating procedures, as stipulated, would be followed by flight operators.

"There are standard operating procedures for commercial flights, freight flights, cargo flights... very clearly stipulated procedures. I am sure the companies concerned are looking into it."

Baglay also said that a warm reception would be accorded to the flight when it lands in Delhi with Afghan products like dry fruits and other agro-goods.

--IANS

sar/vsc/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22