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Lower prenatal attachment may lead to infant developmental delays

A low sense of attachment between an expectant mother and her unborn child could be associated with some infant developmental problems like infant temperament and uncontrolled crying, a new study has found.

Early findings from the study, conducted on over 700 mother-child relationships, suggested that mothers with a stronger bond to their unborn babies were more likely to have babies that were proficient in a range of skills.

"People may think a bond between a mother and child begins when the mother cradles their newborn in their arms, but it begins well before they have met face-to-face," said Grace Branjerdporn, researcher at the University of Queensland School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, in Australia.

"The research provides the foundation for looking more closely at assessing and improving maternal-fetal attachment and giving kids a head-start before they are born," Branjerdporn added in the study, published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal.

The research showed that prenatal attachment has an effect on a baby's personality, but they are still studying if it has a bearing on a baby's ability to master skills like walking, talking and problem-solving.

--IANS

som/ask/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Business Standard
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Business Standard

Lower prenatal attachment may lead to infant developmental delays

IANS  |  Sydney 

A low sense of attachment between an expectant mother and her unborn child could be associated with some infant developmental problems like infant temperament and uncontrolled crying, a new study has found.

Early findings from the study, conducted on over 700 mother-child relationships, suggested that mothers with a stronger bond to their unborn babies were more likely to have babies that were proficient in a range of skills.

"People may think a bond between a mother and child begins when the mother cradles their newborn in their arms, but it begins well before they have met face-to-face," said Grace Branjerdporn, researcher at the University of Queensland School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, in Australia.

"The research provides the foundation for looking more closely at assessing and improving maternal-fetal attachment and giving kids a head-start before they are born," Branjerdporn added in the study, published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal.

The research showed that prenatal attachment has an effect on a baby's personality, but they are still studying if it has a bearing on a baby's ability to master skills like walking, talking and problem-solving.

--IANS

som/ask/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Lower prenatal attachment may lead to infant developmental delays

A low sense of attachment between an expectant mother and her unborn child could be associated with some infant developmental problems like infant temperament and uncontrolled crying, a new study has found.

A low sense of attachment between an expectant mother and her unborn child could be associated with some infant developmental problems like infant temperament and uncontrolled crying, a new study has found.

Early findings from the study, conducted on over 700 mother-child relationships, suggested that mothers with a stronger bond to their unborn babies were more likely to have babies that were proficient in a range of skills.

"People may think a bond between a mother and child begins when the mother cradles their newborn in their arms, but it begins well before they have met face-to-face," said Grace Branjerdporn, researcher at the University of Queensland School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, in Australia.

"The research provides the foundation for looking more closely at assessing and improving maternal-fetal attachment and giving kids a head-start before they are born," Branjerdporn added in the study, published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal.

The research showed that prenatal attachment has an effect on a baby's personality, but they are still studying if it has a bearing on a baby's ability to master skills like walking, talking and problem-solving.

--IANS

som/ask/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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