You are here: Home » News-IANS » Sports
Business Standard

Phil Hughes's family storms out of inquest into his death

IANS  |  Canberra 

The family of Australian cricketer Phil Hughes, who died after being struck by a ball in a match two years ago, on Friday walked out in tears from the inquest into their son's death with their lawyer accusing witnesses of giving misleading evidence to the coroner.

The five-day coronial inquest concluded in dramatic fashion when the parents and brother of Hughes walked out of the inquest during closing comments, reports Xinhua.

Earlier in the week, opposing layers and teammates both denied hearing comments such as "I'm going to kill you", which were allegedly aimed at Hughes during the fatal match. Players also denied knowledge of a plan to bowl "bouncers" -- intimidating balls aimed at a batsman's head -- at Hughes.

On Friday, the family's counsel, Greg Melick SC, accused the players who gave evidence at the inquest of providing "pre-fabricated" evidence to the coroner.

"The family believe and we say the evidence is quite clear, there was a plan to bowl short-pitched deliveries to Phillip, there was sledging," Melick said.

Following Melick's closing comments, Cricket Australia's (CA) counsel Bruce Hodgkinson SC told coroner Michael Barnes the accusations by Melick and the family was "unsubstantiated" -- something which moved Hughes' family to leave the inquest early.

"The court has heard some unsubstantiated evidence," Hodgkinson said. "None of that should weigh on the sworn testimony of players."

Earlier in the day, Katrina Stern SC, the counsel assisting the coroner said the death should be ruled accidental, and made seven final recommendations for the coroner to consider ahead of his final ruling, including a recommendation that CA's staff and players learn hand signals to indicate the need for emergency assistance.

It was also recommended that professional umpires be trained in first aid, while further research into helmet and neck protection should also be undertaken.

Hughes, 25, died in hospital on November 27, 2014, two days after being hit in the neck by a ball.

The coroner is expected to hand down his findings from the inquest on November 4.

--IANS

tri/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Phil Hughes's family storms out of inquest into his death

The family of Australian cricketer Phil Hughes, who died after being struck by a ball in a match two years ago, on Friday walked out in tears from the inquest into their son's death with their lawyer accusing witnesses of giving misleading evidence to the coroner.

The family of Australian cricketer Phil Hughes, who died after being struck by a ball in a match two years ago, on Friday walked out in tears from the inquest into their son's death with their lawyer accusing witnesses of giving misleading evidence to the coroner.

The five-day coronial inquest concluded in dramatic fashion when the parents and brother of Hughes walked out of the inquest during closing comments, reports Xinhua.

Earlier in the week, opposing layers and teammates both denied hearing comments such as "I'm going to kill you", which were allegedly aimed at Hughes during the fatal match. Players also denied knowledge of a plan to bowl "bouncers" -- intimidating balls aimed at a batsman's head -- at Hughes.

On Friday, the family's counsel, Greg Melick SC, accused the players who gave evidence at the inquest of providing "pre-fabricated" evidence to the coroner.

"The family believe and we say the evidence is quite clear, there was a plan to bowl short-pitched deliveries to Phillip, there was sledging," Melick said.

Following Melick's closing comments, Cricket Australia's (CA) counsel Bruce Hodgkinson SC told coroner Michael Barnes the accusations by Melick and the family was "unsubstantiated" -- something which moved Hughes' family to leave the inquest early.

"The court has heard some unsubstantiated evidence," Hodgkinson said. "None of that should weigh on the sworn testimony of players."

Earlier in the day, Katrina Stern SC, the counsel assisting the coroner said the death should be ruled accidental, and made seven final recommendations for the coroner to consider ahead of his final ruling, including a recommendation that CA's staff and players learn hand signals to indicate the need for emergency assistance.

It was also recommended that professional umpires be trained in first aid, while further research into helmet and neck protection should also be undertaken.

Hughes, 25, died in hospital on November 27, 2014, two days after being hit in the neck by a ball.

The coroner is expected to hand down his findings from the inquest on November 4.

--IANS

tri/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Phil Hughes's family storms out of inquest into his death

The family of Australian cricketer Phil Hughes, who died after being struck by a ball in a match two years ago, on Friday walked out in tears from the inquest into their son's death with their lawyer accusing witnesses of giving misleading evidence to the coroner.

The five-day coronial inquest concluded in dramatic fashion when the parents and brother of Hughes walked out of the inquest during closing comments, reports Xinhua.

Earlier in the week, opposing layers and teammates both denied hearing comments such as "I'm going to kill you", which were allegedly aimed at Hughes during the fatal match. Players also denied knowledge of a plan to bowl "bouncers" -- intimidating balls aimed at a batsman's head -- at Hughes.

On Friday, the family's counsel, Greg Melick SC, accused the players who gave evidence at the inquest of providing "pre-fabricated" evidence to the coroner.

"The family believe and we say the evidence is quite clear, there was a plan to bowl short-pitched deliveries to Phillip, there was sledging," Melick said.

Following Melick's closing comments, Cricket Australia's (CA) counsel Bruce Hodgkinson SC told coroner Michael Barnes the accusations by Melick and the family was "unsubstantiated" -- something which moved Hughes' family to leave the inquest early.

"The court has heard some unsubstantiated evidence," Hodgkinson said. "None of that should weigh on the sworn testimony of players."

Earlier in the day, Katrina Stern SC, the counsel assisting the coroner said the death should be ruled accidental, and made seven final recommendations for the coroner to consider ahead of his final ruling, including a recommendation that CA's staff and players learn hand signals to indicate the need for emergency assistance.

It was also recommended that professional umpires be trained in first aid, while further research into helmet and neck protection should also be undertaken.

Hughes, 25, died in hospital on November 27, 2014, two days after being hit in the neck by a ball.

The coroner is expected to hand down his findings from the inquest on November 4.

--IANS

tri/dg

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard