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Scottish museum to house UK's biggest Viking treasure collection

IANS  |  Edinburgh 

The biggest ever collection of rare and unique objects from the Viking age found in has been given a new permanent home at Scotland's national museum in

Queen Elizabeth's official representative in told National Museums (NMS) that it must make a payment within six months of 1.98 million pounds ($2.56 million) to the man who discovered the buried treasure, Xinhua news agency reported.

Using a metal detector, he unearthed the treasure in the Dumfries and Galway area that had been buried for 1,000 years.

Known as the Galloway Hoard, the collection was described by NMS as unparalleled find of Viking-age gold, silver and jewelled treasures.

A spokesman for NMS said on Saturday: "The hoard, which brings together the richest collection of rare and unique Viking-age objects ever found in or Ireland, is of international significance and will transform our understanding of this period of Scottish history."

"The Galloway Hoard is of outstanding international significance. We now have six months to raise 1.98 million pounds to acquire this unique treasure for the nation and ensure it can be enjoyed by future generations both at home and abroad," said NMS Director Gordon Rintoul.

Martin Goldberg, senior curator of Early Medieval and Viking Collections at NMS, said: "Nothing like this has ever been found in The stories it can tell will expand our knowledge of the Viking Age."

NMS, which runs the National Museum of in Edinburgh, wants a selection of the find to be displayed at the Kirkcudbright Art Gallery, close to where it was discovered.

The Viking Age is the period from the late 8th century to the mid-11th century in European history.

--IANS

ksk

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Scottish museum to house UK's biggest Viking treasure collection

The biggest ever collection of rare and unique objects from the Viking age found in Britain has been given a new permanent home at Scotland's national museum in Edinburgh.

The biggest ever collection of rare and unique objects from the Viking age found in has been given a new permanent home at Scotland's national museum in

Queen Elizabeth's official representative in told National Museums (NMS) that it must make a payment within six months of 1.98 million pounds ($2.56 million) to the man who discovered the buried treasure, Xinhua news agency reported.

Using a metal detector, he unearthed the treasure in the Dumfries and Galway area that had been buried for 1,000 years.

Known as the Galloway Hoard, the collection was described by NMS as unparalleled find of Viking-age gold, silver and jewelled treasures.

A spokesman for NMS said on Saturday: "The hoard, which brings together the richest collection of rare and unique Viking-age objects ever found in or Ireland, is of international significance and will transform our understanding of this period of Scottish history."

"The Galloway Hoard is of outstanding international significance. We now have six months to raise 1.98 million pounds to acquire this unique treasure for the nation and ensure it can be enjoyed by future generations both at home and abroad," said NMS Director Gordon Rintoul.

Martin Goldberg, senior curator of Early Medieval and Viking Collections at NMS, said: "Nothing like this has ever been found in The stories it can tell will expand our knowledge of the Viking Age."

NMS, which runs the National Museum of in Edinburgh, wants a selection of the find to be displayed at the Kirkcudbright Art Gallery, close to where it was discovered.

The Viking Age is the period from the late 8th century to the mid-11th century in European history.

--IANS

ksk

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Scottish museum to house UK's biggest Viking treasure collection

The biggest ever collection of rare and unique objects from the Viking age found in has been given a new permanent home at Scotland's national museum in

Queen Elizabeth's official representative in told National Museums (NMS) that it must make a payment within six months of 1.98 million pounds ($2.56 million) to the man who discovered the buried treasure, Xinhua news agency reported.

Using a metal detector, he unearthed the treasure in the Dumfries and Galway area that had been buried for 1,000 years.

Known as the Galloway Hoard, the collection was described by NMS as unparalleled find of Viking-age gold, silver and jewelled treasures.

A spokesman for NMS said on Saturday: "The hoard, which brings together the richest collection of rare and unique Viking-age objects ever found in or Ireland, is of international significance and will transform our understanding of this period of Scottish history."

"The Galloway Hoard is of outstanding international significance. We now have six months to raise 1.98 million pounds to acquire this unique treasure for the nation and ensure it can be enjoyed by future generations both at home and abroad," said NMS Director Gordon Rintoul.

Martin Goldberg, senior curator of Early Medieval and Viking Collections at NMS, said: "Nothing like this has ever been found in The stories it can tell will expand our knowledge of the Viking Age."

NMS, which runs the National Museum of in Edinburgh, wants a selection of the find to be displayed at the Kirkcudbright Art Gallery, close to where it was discovered.

The Viking Age is the period from the late 8th century to the mid-11th century in European history.

--IANS

ksk

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22