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Staff didn't steal information from customers' phones: Apple

IANS  |  Sydney 

Hit by a photo-sharing scandal with reports claiming that Apple staff lifted information from customers' phones that came for repair, the company on Friday denied that any such episode happened at the Carindale store in Queensland.

Courier Mail reported on Thursday that employees at the store were fired after they were found sharing photos of customers.

The Cupertino, San Francisco-based company, however, said they have not found any such evidence so far.

"Based on our investigation thus far, we have seen no evidence that customer data or photos were inappropriately transferred or that anyone was photographed by these former employees," the Apple statement said.

According to Courier Mail, Australian Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim has asked for more information in the incident.

"We are aware of the reports and will be making inquiries with Apple to seek further information. This is an important reminder that all organisations that collect and manage personal information need to embed a culture of privacy and ensure employees understand their responsibilities," Pilgrim was quoted as saying.

Steph Doukas, 28, who gave her phone for repair, was in shock.

"If it happened to me I would just be distraught. All my information was on my phone and backed up to my iCloud, and I just left it with them," she was quoted as saying.

Queensland Police also visited the Carindale store to seek more information. "Any person who wishes to make a complaint is asked to contact police," a spokesperson said.

Meanwhile, the senior staff at various Apple stores warned employees not to take photographs of colleagues or customers, the report added.

"Apple believes in treating everyone equally and with respect, and we do not tolerate behaviour that goes against our values," the statement further read.

--IANS

na/py/

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Staff didn't steal information from customers' phones: Apple

Hit by a photo-sharing scandal with reports claiming that Apple staff lifted information from customers' phones that came for repair, the company on Friday denied that any such episode happened at the Carindale store in Queensland.

Hit by a photo-sharing scandal with reports claiming that Apple staff lifted information from customers' phones that came for repair, the company on Friday denied that any such episode happened at the Carindale store in Queensland.

Courier Mail reported on Thursday that employees at the store were fired after they were found sharing photos of customers.

The Cupertino, San Francisco-based company, however, said they have not found any such evidence so far.

"Based on our investigation thus far, we have seen no evidence that customer data or photos were inappropriately transferred or that anyone was photographed by these former employees," the Apple statement said.

According to Courier Mail, Australian Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim has asked for more information in the incident.

"We are aware of the reports and will be making inquiries with Apple to seek further information. This is an important reminder that all organisations that collect and manage personal information need to embed a culture of privacy and ensure employees understand their responsibilities," Pilgrim was quoted as saying.

Steph Doukas, 28, who gave her phone for repair, was in shock.

"If it happened to me I would just be distraught. All my information was on my phone and backed up to my iCloud, and I just left it with them," she was quoted as saying.

Queensland Police also visited the Carindale store to seek more information. "Any person who wishes to make a complaint is asked to contact police," a spokesperson said.

Meanwhile, the senior staff at various Apple stores warned employees not to take photographs of colleagues or customers, the report added.

"Apple believes in treating everyone equally and with respect, and we do not tolerate behaviour that goes against our values," the statement further read.

--IANS

na/py/

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Staff didn't steal information from customers' phones: Apple

Hit by a photo-sharing scandal with reports claiming that Apple staff lifted information from customers' phones that came for repair, the company on Friday denied that any such episode happened at the Carindale store in Queensland.

Courier Mail reported on Thursday that employees at the store were fired after they were found sharing photos of customers.

The Cupertino, San Francisco-based company, however, said they have not found any such evidence so far.

"Based on our investigation thus far, we have seen no evidence that customer data or photos were inappropriately transferred or that anyone was photographed by these former employees," the Apple statement said.

According to Courier Mail, Australian Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim has asked for more information in the incident.

"We are aware of the reports and will be making inquiries with Apple to seek further information. This is an important reminder that all organisations that collect and manage personal information need to embed a culture of privacy and ensure employees understand their responsibilities," Pilgrim was quoted as saying.

Steph Doukas, 28, who gave her phone for repair, was in shock.

"If it happened to me I would just be distraught. All my information was on my phone and backed up to my iCloud, and I just left it with them," she was quoted as saying.

Queensland Police also visited the Carindale store to seek more information. "Any person who wishes to make a complaint is asked to contact police," a spokesperson said.

Meanwhile, the senior staff at various Apple stores warned employees not to take photographs of colleagues or customers, the report added.

"Apple believes in treating everyone equally and with respect, and we do not tolerate behaviour that goes against our values," the statement further read.

--IANS

na/py/

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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