Test to reveal if your coffee is fake

Is your cup of hot coffee brimming with ingredients like starch syrup that are neither sweet nor flavourful? Worry not as a test to detect counterfeit coffee is here.

According to a significant study, growing coffee shortages may increase the chance of having fillers in your coffee in the future.

With new test, it is now possible to know with 95 percent accuracy if coffee is pure or has been tampered with corn, barley, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, acai seed, brown sugar or starch syrup, researchers said.

These extra ingredients, though not harmful, make ground coffee go farther and increase profits for producers.

"With a lower supply of coffee in the market, prices rise and that favours fraud because of the economic gain," said lead researcher Suzana Lucy Nixdorf from State University of Londrina in Brazil.

The test uses liquid chromatography and statistical tools.

This gives the team a much closer look at the ingredients in an unbiased way, according to Nixdorf.

Chromatography is a powerful analytical technique that is very sensitive and highly selective.

"Because much of the coffee is composed of carbohydrates, researchers could develop a 'characteristic fingerprint' when using chromatography that separates out the real coffee compounds," Nixdorf noted.

The added, unwanted grain fillers generate different levels of sugars than the natural ingredients, so they are easy to identify.

According to researchers, after roasting and grinding the raw material, it becomes impossible to see any difference between grains of lower cost incorporated into the coffee, especially because of the dark colour and oily texture of coffee.

"Our test quickly finds coffee containing unwanted fillers before the beverage reaches stores and restaurants," researchers said.

The findings will be part of the 248th national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, this week.

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

Test to reveal if your coffee is fake

IANS  |  New York 



Is your cup of hot coffee brimming with ingredients like starch syrup that are neither sweet nor flavourful? Worry not as a test to detect counterfeit coffee is here.

According to a significant study, growing coffee shortages may increase the chance of having fillers in your coffee in the future.

With new test, it is now possible to know with 95 percent accuracy if coffee is pure or has been tampered with corn, barley, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, acai seed, brown sugar or starch syrup, researchers said.

These extra ingredients, though not harmful, make ground coffee go farther and increase profits for producers.

"With a lower supply of coffee in the market, prices rise and that favours fraud because of the economic gain," said lead researcher Suzana Lucy Nixdorf from State University of Londrina in Brazil.

The test uses liquid chromatography and statistical tools.

This gives the team a much closer look at the ingredients in an unbiased way, according to Nixdorf.

Chromatography is a powerful analytical technique that is very sensitive and highly selective.

"Because much of the coffee is composed of carbohydrates, researchers could develop a 'characteristic fingerprint' when using chromatography that separates out the real coffee compounds," Nixdorf noted.

The added, unwanted grain fillers generate different levels of sugars than the natural ingredients, so they are easy to identify.

According to researchers, after roasting and grinding the raw material, it becomes impossible to see any difference between grains of lower cost incorporated into the coffee, especially because of the dark colour and oily texture of coffee.

"Our test quickly finds coffee containing unwanted fillers before the beverage reaches stores and restaurants," researchers said.

The findings will be part of the 248th national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, this week.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Test to reveal if your coffee is fake

Is your cup of hot coffee brimming with ingredients like starch syrup that are neither sweet nor flavourful? Worry not as a test to detect counterfeit coffee is here.

Is your cup of hot coffee brimming with ingredients like starch syrup that are neither sweet nor flavourful? Worry not as a test to detect counterfeit coffee is here.

According to a significant study, growing coffee shortages may increase the chance of having fillers in your coffee in the future.

With new test, it is now possible to know with 95 percent accuracy if coffee is pure or has been tampered with corn, barley, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, acai seed, brown sugar or starch syrup, researchers said.

These extra ingredients, though not harmful, make ground coffee go farther and increase profits for producers.

"With a lower supply of coffee in the market, prices rise and that favours fraud because of the economic gain," said lead researcher Suzana Lucy Nixdorf from State University of Londrina in Brazil.

The test uses liquid chromatography and statistical tools.

This gives the team a much closer look at the ingredients in an unbiased way, according to Nixdorf.

Chromatography is a powerful analytical technique that is very sensitive and highly selective.

"Because much of the coffee is composed of carbohydrates, researchers could develop a 'characteristic fingerprint' when using chromatography that separates out the real coffee compounds," Nixdorf noted.

The added, unwanted grain fillers generate different levels of sugars than the natural ingredients, so they are easy to identify.

According to researchers, after roasting and grinding the raw material, it becomes impossible to see any difference between grains of lower cost incorporated into the coffee, especially because of the dark colour and oily texture of coffee.

"Our test quickly finds coffee containing unwanted fillers before the beverage reaches stores and restaurants," researchers said.

The findings will be part of the 248th national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, this week.

image
Business Standard
177 22

More News

  • SMEs fuelling India growth story: Adaire Fox-Martin SMEs fuelling India growth story: Adaire Fox-Martin
  • (From left to right) Dr Arvind Lal, CMD,  Dr Lal PathLabs Pvt Ltd and  Dr Om Manchanda, CEO, Lal PathLabs Pvt. Ltd at the announcement of Dr Lal PathLabs IPO in Mumbai (pic: Suryakant Niwate) Dr Lal PathLabs faces pricing pressure, margin erosion
Widgets Magazine
Widgets Magazine

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard