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Letter: Polls not a deterrent

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence

Vinay Kant Kapur  |  New Delhi 

With reference to the editorial, “Flawed logic” (November 29), the idea of holding simultaneous elections to the Lok Sabha and state Assemblies emanates from an obvious desire to extend the power base of the ruling party. 

The perception that state Assembly elections from time to time distract the Centre from good governance is anathema to the concept of democracy and federalism and is disrespectful to the electorate. A political party may come to power at the Centre as well in the states riding a wave of public sympathy or emotions triggered by a well-meaning charismatic leader.

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence. As the Constitution does not seem to provide for referendums, scattered state elections are a blessing in disguise in the sense that they do tend to reflect the general mood of the public during the five-year tenure of the party at the Centre. These elections also serve as a system of checks and balances in a democratic set-up.

The elected government at the Centre is supposed to represent the will and support of the people at all times and not just on the day of election. Promises made during elections are to be backed up by performance, and results of good governance should gradually become visible to the public.  This means that an elected government has to be on its toes all the time.

It may not be preposterous to suggest that even the polls to the Lok Sabha should be scattered, with one-fifth of the seats going to the polls every year.

The anxiety that governance suffers due to elections is imaginary for a government that works. Good governance will improve the tally of the ruling party.

Vinay Kant Kapur, New Delhi

can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to: 
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg 
New Delhi 110 002 
Fax: (011) 23720201  ·  E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All must have a postal address and telephone number

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Letter: Polls not a deterrent

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence
With reference to the editorial, “Flawed logic” (November 29), the idea of holding simultaneous elections to the Lok Sabha and state Assemblies emanates from an obvious desire to extend the power base of the ruling party. 

The perception that state Assembly elections from time to time distract the Centre from good governance is anathema to the concept of democracy and federalism and is disrespectful to the electorate. A political party may come to power at the Centre as well in the states riding a wave of public sympathy or emotions triggered by a well-meaning charismatic leader.

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence. As the Constitution does not seem to provide for referendums, scattered state elections are a blessing in disguise in the sense that they do tend to reflect the general mood of the public during the five-year tenure of the party at the Centre. These elections also serve as a system of checks and balances in a democratic set-up.

The elected government at the Centre is supposed to represent the will and support of the people at all times and not just on the day of election. Promises made during elections are to be backed up by performance, and results of good governance should gradually become visible to the public.  This means that an elected government has to be on its toes all the time.

It may not be preposterous to suggest that even the polls to the Lok Sabha should be scattered, with one-fifth of the seats going to the polls every year.

The anxiety that governance suffers due to elections is imaginary for a government that works. Good governance will improve the tally of the ruling party.

Vinay Kant Kapur, New Delhi

can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to: 
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg 
New Delhi 110 002 
Fax: (011) 23720201  ·  E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All must have a postal address and telephone number

image
Business Standard
177 22

Letter: Polls not a deterrent

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence

With reference to the editorial, “Flawed logic” (November 29), the idea of holding simultaneous elections to the Lok Sabha and state Assemblies emanates from an obvious desire to extend the power base of the ruling party. 

The perception that state Assembly elections from time to time distract the Centre from good governance is anathema to the concept of democracy and federalism and is disrespectful to the electorate. A political party may come to power at the Centre as well in the states riding a wave of public sympathy or emotions triggered by a well-meaning charismatic leader.

However, power across the board in the absence of public feedback has a corrupting influence. As the Constitution does not seem to provide for referendums, scattered state elections are a blessing in disguise in the sense that they do tend to reflect the general mood of the public during the five-year tenure of the party at the Centre. These elections also serve as a system of checks and balances in a democratic set-up.

The elected government at the Centre is supposed to represent the will and support of the people at all times and not just on the day of election. Promises made during elections are to be backed up by performance, and results of good governance should gradually become visible to the public.  This means that an elected government has to be on its toes all the time.

It may not be preposterous to suggest that even the polls to the Lok Sabha should be scattered, with one-fifth of the seats going to the polls every year.

The anxiety that governance suffers due to elections is imaginary for a government that works. Good governance will improve the tally of the ruling party.

Vinay Kant Kapur, New Delhi

can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to: 
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg 
New Delhi 110 002 
Fax: (011) 23720201  ·  E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All must have a postal address and telephone number

image
Business Standard
177 22

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