Business Standard

Letters: 'Most honourable' Gupta?

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted.

Business Standard  |  New Delhi 

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). Many phrases come to my mind to describe Rajat Gupta — “high profile”, “star performer”, and even “honoured”, to mention a few. But certainly not “most honourable”, as used by the writer.

Shreekant Sambrani Baroda

. . . as the law stands

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). I do not agree with the writer’s analysis that Gupta challenging the administrative proceedings and opting for a court trial – when administrative proceedings would have involved only civil liabilities and penalty – was inexplicable.

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted. As the law stands, he could still be prosecuted. Moreover, the lawyers must have made him understand and he would have been convinced himself that the evidence against him was not strong enough to hold him guilty.

At that stage, all the evidence is never disclosed. It was only known once the trial started. Hence, the decision to contest the administrative proceedings. Also, he has never admitted to date that he was involved in insider trading. His statement has to be read carefully. He has only said what he has done has tarnished his image and has done damage to his family, values, and so on.

Sukumar Mukhopadhyay New Delhi

Letters can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to:
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg


New Delhi 110 002
Fax: (011) 23720201
E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All letters must have a postal address and telephone number

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Letters: 'Most honourable' Gupta?

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted.

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). Many phrases come to my mind to describe Rajat Gupta — “high profile”, “star performer”, and even “honoured”, to mention a few. But certainly not “most honourable”, as used by the writer.

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). Many phrases come to my mind to describe Rajat Gupta — “high profile”, “star performer”, and even “honoured”, to mention a few. But certainly not “most honourable”, as used by the writer.

Shreekant Sambrani Baroda

. . . as the law stands

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). I do not agree with the writer’s analysis that Gupta challenging the administrative proceedings and opting for a court trial – when administrative proceedings would have involved only civil liabilities and penalty – was inexplicable.

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted. As the law stands, he could still be prosecuted. Moreover, the lawyers must have made him understand and he would have been convinced himself that the evidence against him was not strong enough to hold him guilty.

At that stage, all the evidence is never disclosed. It was only known once the trial started. Hence, the decision to contest the administrative proceedings. Also, he has never admitted to date that he was involved in insider trading. His statement has to be read carefully. He has only said what he has done has tarnished his image and has done damage to his family, values, and so on.

Sukumar Mukhopadhyay New Delhi

Letters can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to:
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg
New Delhi 110 002
Fax: (011) 23720201
E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All letters must have a postal address and telephone number

image
Business Standard
177 22

Letters: 'Most honourable' Gupta?

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted.

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). Many phrases come to my mind to describe Rajat Gupta — “high profile”, “star performer”, and even “honoured”, to mention a few. But certainly not “most honourable”, as used by the writer.

Shreekant Sambrani Baroda

. . . as the law stands

This refers to Pratip Kar’s article “What the Rajat Gupta trial teaches us” (October 29). I do not agree with the writer’s analysis that Gupta challenging the administrative proceedings and opting for a court trial – when administrative proceedings would have involved only civil liabilities and penalty – was inexplicable.

If Gupta had admitted his guilt and opted for administrative proceedings, there was no guarantee that he would not be prosecuted. As the law stands, he could still be prosecuted. Moreover, the lawyers must have made him understand and he would have been convinced himself that the evidence against him was not strong enough to hold him guilty.

At that stage, all the evidence is never disclosed. It was only known once the trial started. Hence, the decision to contest the administrative proceedings. Also, he has never admitted to date that he was involved in insider trading. His statement has to be read carefully. He has only said what he has done has tarnished his image and has done damage to his family, values, and so on.

Sukumar Mukhopadhyay New Delhi

Letters can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to:
The Editor, Business Standard
Nehru House, 4 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg
New Delhi 110 002
Fax: (011) 23720201
E-mail: letters@bsmail.in
All letters must have a postal address and telephone number

image
Business Standard
177 22

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