Business Standard

'Aam Aadmi Party's performance is significant, it is not about historic politics'

Interview with Director of the Asia Research Centre and India Observatory in the London School of Economics

Ruth Kattumuri
Related News

Dr Ruth Kattumuri, a Director of the Asia Research Centre and India Observatory in the London School of Economics, says that performance of Aam Aadmi Party in the recent Delhi cannot be judged from the point of view of historic or established politics. Kattumuri, who was in Delhi to take part in the recently concluded  Delhi Economics Conclave, tells Vrishti Beniwal that UPA-II worked very hard in introducing social welfare schemes, but the people's verdict is clear.

Do you see any fiscal slippages as the government might try to offer sops to the public ahead of general elections next year, particularly after it lost out in four states in the Assembly elections?

The only point I can make without knowing the details is that UPA-II has worked very hard in introducing several social programmes and also in trying to develop institutional systems for their implementation. There is a lot more to be done. But despite that people’s verdict is what it is. So that is not going to solve the problem anymore. One of the interesting things about India is that it is becoming a mature democracy. It was evident in the last elections. The common man is beginning to say that we have a voice and we will express that voice more strongly. What has happened with the AamAadmi Party in Delhi is significant. It is not about historic politics or the established politics.

As far as reforms are concerned, particularly legislative reforms, do you think there will be a comma, if not a full stop, because of the general elections next year?

Institutions exist and they will continue to do their job irrespective of elections. Only in case of issues which have to go through the Parliamentary system there would be delays.

How do you look at the functioning of the Indian government in the last five years? Do you agree that India suffered from ‘policy paralysis’?

The challenge in India is that people in Parliament are not allowing it to sit. Apart from that I don’t think that there is policy paralysis. Lots of policies and reforms have been introduced in the last five years, but we need to scale up. Strengthening of institutions has happened perceptibly, but the public awareness of these is limited.

From over 9%GDP growth we have come to 5%now.

A. It’s not in India alone. It’s part of the current global scenario.

Do you think growth has bottomed out and we are recovering now

I think it has bottomed out and we are going to go up from here because there are systems now. That’s interesting about India. The public is able to voice these things openly and the change also begins to happen.

India’s food security programme has been criticised by many as it does not address problems like malnutrition and sanitation. What are your views?

What has to be addressed is the issue of malnutrition. There is a good example in Tamil Nadu with Amma’sCanteen which provides nutritious meals at a reasonable cost. Sanitation is also important  and has to be dealt with. Every individual has a fundamental right to at least one full meal in a day and there is enough grain in the world to feed all the seven billion people. There have been different schemes to help overcome these and there are sometimes challenges of implementation in India, which have to be addressed.

How do you look at the ‘Peace Clause’ floated at WTO meet? It comes with certain riders.

I do believe you have to provide facilities to address certain social, economic and developmental problems. There should not be permanent structures. At every stage there should be monitoring and evaluation and if at a certain time the need has been met we have to reform. Right now there is a need to provide subsidies to certain section of the society. We know capacity for efficient implementation is a problem and we should do things to address that.

How do you see India’s efforts in the direction of education and skill development?

Lots of good things have happened in the last few years but the demand is so much more. We have a young population and need to address the gap in opportunities between rural and urban areas. There is a lot of human capital in the urban areas and there is a need to make most of that capital, providing not just skills and education but also professional skills. At the same time you have to create jobs too.


Read more on:   
|
|
|

'Aam Aadmi Party's performance is significant, it is not about historic politics'

Interview with Director of the Asia Research Centre and India Observatory in the London School of Economics

Dr Ruth Kattumuri, a Director of the Asia Research Centre and India Observatory in the London School of Economics, says that performance of Aam Aadmi Party in the recent Delhi assembly elections cannot be judged from the point of view of historic or established politics. Kattumuri, who was in Delhi to take part in the recently concluded Delhi Economics Conclave, tells Vrishti Beniwal that UPA-II worked very hard in introducing social welfare schemes, but the people's verdict is clear.
Dr Ruth Kattumuri, a Director of the Asia Research Centre and India Observatory in the London School of Economics, says that performance of Aam Aadmi Party in the recent Delhi assembly elections cannot be judged from the point of view of historic or established politics. Kattumuri, who was in Delhi to take part in the recently concluded  Delhi Economics Conclave, tells Vrishti Beniwal that UPA-II worked very hard in introducing social welfare schemes, but the people's verdict is clear.

Do you see any fiscal slippages as the government might try to offer sops to the public ahead of general elections next year, particularly after it lost out in four states in the Assembly elections?

The only point I can make without knowing the details is that UPA-II has worked very hard in introducing several social programmes and also in trying to develop institutional systems for their implementation. There is a lot more to be done. But despite that people’s verdict is what it is. So that is not going to solve the problem anymore. One of the interesting things about India is that it is becoming a mature democracy. It was evident in the last elections. The common man is beginning to say that we have a voice and we will express that voice more strongly. What has happened with the AamAadmi Party in Delhi is significant. It is not about historic politics or the established politics.

As far as reforms are concerned, particularly legislative reforms, do you think there will be a comma, if not a full stop, because of the general elections next year?

Institutions exist and they will continue to do their job irrespective of elections. Only in case of issues which have to go through the Parliamentary system there would be delays.

How do you look at the functioning of the Indian government in the last five years? Do you agree that India suffered from ‘policy paralysis’?

The challenge in India is that people in Parliament are not allowing it to sit. Apart from that I don’t think that there is policy paralysis. Lots of policies and reforms have been introduced in the last five years, but we need to scale up. Strengthening of institutions has happened perceptibly, but the public awareness of these is limited.

From over 9%GDP growth we have come to 5%now.

A. It’s not in India alone. It’s part of the current global scenario.

Do you think growth has bottomed out and we are recovering now

I think it has bottomed out and we are going to go up from here because there are systems now. That’s interesting about India. The public is able to voice these things openly and the change also begins to happen.

India’s food security programme has been criticised by many as it does not address problems like malnutrition and sanitation. What are your views?

What has to be addressed is the issue of malnutrition. There is a good example in Tamil Nadu with Amma’sCanteen which provides nutritious meals at a reasonable cost. Sanitation is also important  and has to be dealt with. Every individual has a fundamental right to at least one full meal in a day and there is enough grain in the world to feed all the seven billion people. There have been different schemes to help overcome these and there are sometimes challenges of implementation in India, which have to be addressed.

How do you look at the ‘Peace Clause’ floated at WTO meet? It comes with certain riders.

I do believe you have to provide facilities to address certain social, economic and developmental problems. There should not be permanent structures. At every stage there should be monitoring and evaluation and if at a certain time the need has been met we have to reform. Right now there is a need to provide subsidies to certain section of the society. We know capacity for efficient implementation is a problem and we should do things to address that.

How do you see India’s efforts in the direction of education and skill development?

Lots of good things have happened in the last few years but the demand is so much more. We have a young population and need to address the gap in opportunities between rural and urban areas. There is a lot of human capital in the urban areas and there is a need to make most of that capital, providing not just skills and education but also professional skills. At the same time you have to create jobs too.


image

Recommended for you

Columnists Rss icon

Ajai Shukla

Ajai Shukla: Don't divide the army, Mr Parrikar
Ajai Shukla

Internal simmering in the army has come to a boil after the govt tries to retain a discriminatory promotions policy

Hasmukh Shah

Hasmukh Shah: The real issues behind land acquisition
Hasmukh Shah

Farmers are inextricably tied to their land. Deprived of it, they have little else to fall back on for their livelihood

Editorial Comment Rss icon

New Sun Pharma priority

It has to lead in gaining regulatory trust

Multilateral competition

Bretton Woods institutions must change to stay relevant

TWEETS @ POLITICS
@SinghRPN
RT @NileshMishra0: @SinghRPN समूचे यूपी में एक मात्र सांसद जिन्होंने अपना सारा फंड क्षेत्र के विकास के लिए खर्च किया।
@milinddeora
Mumbai's own @AnandWrites presents a compelling analysis of two Americas. A great writer & even better speaker: http://t.co/vSTKJOoFA4
@digvijaya_28
May like to see this article "Attacking the Cross: Rise in Anti Christian Violence" by Ram Puniyani is http://t.co/PtaA43G5uM
@thekiranbedi
(Am in creative work and in service. Is noisy work only work?? ) @----@---- yes and that apply to @thekiranbedi n by the way where is she?”
@ajaymaken
Launching Android-App based @INCIndia membership drive- Enrolling Dr Manmohan Singh & his wife Gursharan ji in Delhi! http://t.co/UXj8VjpE8y
@MPNaveenJindal
Congratulations @sardarasingh8 (y) https://t.co/8UdIUmD0YQ
@Panda_Jay
My Twitter handle changed yesterday to @PandaJay 😊, please follow that..
@ShashiTharoor
@bajurinav all the best, Aman!
@Swamy39
RT @india_israel: @Swamy39 Very happy that you are aware of the 2 million Hindus in Guyana Trinidad and Suriname !
@narendramodi
Had a very good meeting with Mr. Jack Ma. @alibabagroup http://t.co/QhMbrVTvWE
@abdullah_omar
Great crew on the @IndiGo6E flight from Jammu to Srinagar this afternoon. Thanks a lot guys :)
@varungandhi80
RT @pankajjha_: #BJP MP @varungandhi80 writes a letter to @yad avakhilesh for fair probe in #UP police recruitment @abpnewstv http://t.co/M
@ArvindKejriwal
RT @AamAadmiParty: .@DrKumarVishwas speaks his heart out at AAP NC meeting. Must watch and share! https://t.co/OIpZJgUsLR
@PMOIndia
RT @PIB_India: PM's telephonic conversation with King Salman bin Abdul aziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia: http://t.co/sXBB3Uf8NS
@rajeev_mp
Wht does SC repealing #Section66A mean to 200 million Internet users in India? Read my intrvw @RediffNews http://t.co/OrVBE0R2FP
@quizderek
@siddasgupta Point...thanks
@
Godrej e-marketplace for gourmet food soon http://t.co/wflehvFETB
@SushmaSwaraj
@balukde @lijogeot No. That is not true.
@arunjaitley
I congratulate Saina Nehwal on becoming the world no.1 badminton player. She is the first Indian woman to achieve this historic feat.
@MVENKAIAHNAIDU
At the 38th Indian Social Science Congress at Visakhapatnam today... http://t.co/2LmWIZhOSn
@nitin_gadkari
My reply to letter by Smt. Sonia Gandhi on land acquisition (2/2) http://t.co/wRtCjvMk9d
@DVSBJP
RT @bjpkarnataka: BJP is determined to conquer South India..BJP National Executive to be held in Bengaluru, 4th time in Karnataka http://t.
@umasribharti
चन्‍द्रशेखर राव को बधाई. तेलंगाना राज्‍य का मेरा संकल्‍प एवं सपना पूरा, तेलंगाना की नदियों का ध्‍यान रखेंगें.
@AnanthKumar_BJP
Inauguration of Vishwa Kannadigara Jagruthi Samavesha Venue: Gayathri Vihara, Palace Ground, Bengaluru 29-March-2015 http://t.co/pCYAuhjcMF
@smritiirani
Ramnavami ki aap sabko hardik shubhkamnayein.
@drharshvardhan
Saina Nehwal - Congratulations U have done us proud by your historic win-Being the first Indian woman to become World Champion in badminton.
@Gen_VKSingh
Congratulations @NSaina for becoming the first Indian woman to become the world #1 in badminton.You have made us all very proud!!
@Rao_InderjitS
This small effort on our part will go a long way in reducing the burden of LPG subsidy on India's economy. 3/3
@nsitharaman
With Ms Maha Ali, Jordanian minister for Trade and Supplies. Ambassadors of both countries standing behind. http://t.co/wJCoyP70r7
@RSSorg
श्री रामनवमी की शुभकामनाएं http://t.co/aNevXeA7FI

Back to Top