'Brown dwarfs could host rocky planets'

Astronomers for the first time have found that the outer region of a dusty disc encircling a brown dwarf contains millimetre-sized solid grains like those found in denser discs around newborn stars.

The surprising finding by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) challenges theories of how rocky, Earth-scale planets form, and suggests that rocky planets may be even more common in the Universe than expected.

Rocky planets are thought to form through the random collision and sticking together of what are initially microscopic particles in the disc of material around a star.

These tiny grains, known as cosmic dust, are similar to very fine soot or sand. However, in the outer regions around a brown dwarf

image
Business Standard
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Business Standard

'Brown dwarfs could host rocky planets'

Press Trust of India  |  London 

Astronomers for the first time have found that the outer region of a dusty disc encircling a brown dwarf contains millimetre-sized solid grains like those found in denser discs around newborn stars.

The surprising finding by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) challenges theories of how rocky, Earth-scale planets form, and suggests that rocky planets may be even more common in the Universe than expected.

Rocky planets are thought to form through the random collision and sticking together of what are initially microscopic particles in the disc of material around a star.

These tiny grains, known as cosmic dust, are similar to very fine soot or sand. However, in the outer regions around a brown dwarf

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'Brown dwarfs could host rocky planets'

Brown dwarfs - which inhabit a kind of fuzzy line between stars and planets - could host rocky planets since they have dusty discs encircling them, researchers say.

Astronomers for the first time have found that the outer region of a dusty disc encircling a brown dwarf contains millimetre-sized solid grains like those found in denser discs around newborn stars.

The surprising finding by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) challenges theories of how rocky, Earth-scale planets form, and suggests that rocky planets may be even more common in the Universe than expected.

Rocky planets are thought to form through the random collision and sticking together of what are initially microscopic particles in the disc of material around a star.

These tiny grains, known as cosmic dust, are similar to very fine soot or sand. However, in the outer regions around a brown dwarf image

Business Standard
177 22

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