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Alleged Russia metro blast organiser denies masterminding

AFP  |  Moscow 

A man detained as a suspected organiser of the Saint Petersburg metro bombing denied today that he helped mastermind the attack, but did admit indirect involvement in it.

Russia's FSB security service yesterday said it detained Kyrgyzstan-born Abror Azimov in a suburb of Moscow over the deadly April 3 blast that killed 14 people in Russia's second city.



The FSB alleged Azimov was "one of the organisers" of the attack and had "carried out training" of the suspected 22- year-old suicide bomber Akbarjon Djalilov, who was born in Central Asian Kyrgyzstan.

At a hearing yesterday to formally arrest him, Azimov admitted indirect "involvement" in the attack but denied organising it.

"I do not oppose being arrested. But I did not say that I was involved in the blast," Azimov was quoted as saying by Russian agencies.

"There was some involvement by me, but not direct. I was given an order. I did not understand that I was taking part in terrorist activity."

Russian agencies quoted investigators in as saying that Azimov had confessed to his role in preparing the attack during questioning.

The later ordered Azimov held in detention until June 3 as investigations continue.

Alleged bomber Djalilov is suspected of triggering a homemade explosive device that tore through a metro carriage as it was passing through a tunnel between stations.

Eight other men from ex-Soviet Central Asia have also been detained in Moscow and Saint Petersburg over the bombing.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack but investigators are probing possible ties to Islamic State jihadists, who have threatened to attack in revenge for its intervention in Syria.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Alleged Russia metro blast organiser denies masterminding

A man detained as a suspected organiser of the Saint Petersburg metro bombing denied today that he helped mastermind the attack, but did admit indirect involvement in it. Russia's FSB security service yesterday said it detained Kyrgyzstan-born Abror Azimov in a suburb of Moscow over the deadly April 3 blast that killed 14 people in Russia's second city. The FSB alleged Azimov was "one of the organisers" of the attack and had "carried out training" of the suspected 22- year-old suicide bomber Akbarjon Djalilov, who was born in Central Asian Kyrgyzstan. At a court hearing yesterday to formally arrest him, Azimov admitted indirect "involvement" in the attack but denied organising it. "I do not oppose being arrested. But I did not say that I was involved in the blast," Azimov was quoted as saying by Russian news agencies. "There was some involvement by me, but not direct. I was given an order. I did not understand that I was taking part in terrorist activity." Russian agencies ... A man detained as a suspected organiser of the Saint Petersburg metro bombing denied today that he helped mastermind the attack, but did admit indirect involvement in it.

Russia's FSB security service yesterday said it detained Kyrgyzstan-born Abror Azimov in a suburb of Moscow over the deadly April 3 blast that killed 14 people in Russia's second city.

The FSB alleged Azimov was "one of the organisers" of the attack and had "carried out training" of the suspected 22- year-old suicide bomber Akbarjon Djalilov, who was born in Central Asian Kyrgyzstan.

At a hearing yesterday to formally arrest him, Azimov admitted indirect "involvement" in the attack but denied organising it.

"I do not oppose being arrested. But I did not say that I was involved in the blast," Azimov was quoted as saying by Russian agencies.

"There was some involvement by me, but not direct. I was given an order. I did not understand that I was taking part in terrorist activity."

Russian agencies quoted investigators in as saying that Azimov had confessed to his role in preparing the attack during questioning.

The later ordered Azimov held in detention until June 3 as investigations continue.

Alleged bomber Djalilov is suspected of triggering a homemade explosive device that tore through a metro carriage as it was passing through a tunnel between stations.

Eight other men from ex-Soviet Central Asia have also been detained in Moscow and Saint Petersburg over the bombing.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack but investigators are probing possible ties to Islamic State jihadists, who have threatened to attack in revenge for its intervention in Syria.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
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Alleged Russia metro blast organiser denies masterminding

A man detained as a suspected organiser of the Saint Petersburg metro bombing denied today that he helped mastermind the attack, but did admit indirect involvement in it.

Russia's FSB security service yesterday said it detained Kyrgyzstan-born Abror Azimov in a suburb of Moscow over the deadly April 3 blast that killed 14 people in Russia's second city.

The FSB alleged Azimov was "one of the organisers" of the attack and had "carried out training" of the suspected 22- year-old suicide bomber Akbarjon Djalilov, who was born in Central Asian Kyrgyzstan.

At a hearing yesterday to formally arrest him, Azimov admitted indirect "involvement" in the attack but denied organising it.

"I do not oppose being arrested. But I did not say that I was involved in the blast," Azimov was quoted as saying by Russian agencies.

"There was some involvement by me, but not direct. I was given an order. I did not understand that I was taking part in terrorist activity."

Russian agencies quoted investigators in as saying that Azimov had confessed to his role in preparing the attack during questioning.

The later ordered Azimov held in detention until June 3 as investigations continue.

Alleged bomber Djalilov is suspected of triggering a homemade explosive device that tore through a metro carriage as it was passing through a tunnel between stations.

Eight other men from ex-Soviet Central Asia have also been detained in Moscow and Saint Petersburg over the bombing.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack but investigators are probing possible ties to Islamic State jihadists, who have threatened to attack in revenge for its intervention in Syria.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22