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China has no business to name any Indian place: Naidu

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Union Minister today said "every inch" of belongs to and has "no business" to name any Indian place.

"is totally part and parcel of has no business to name any of the district. I don't know why they have taken this step," Naidu, the Information and Broadcasting Minister, told a press conference here.



Stressing that "every inch of the state belongs to India", the minister said that no foreign country has the right to rename any part of

Naidu asked if anybody's name can be changed if his or her neighbour does so.

The minister was responding to a query on the Chinese action of unilaterally changing the names of six places in

had yesterday announced that it has "standardised" official names for six places in the northeastern state and termed the provocative move as a "legitimate action".

The Chinese move came days after lodged a strong protest with over the Dalai Lama's visit to the frontier state.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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China has no business to name any Indian place: Naidu

Union Minister M Venkaiah Naidu today said "every inch" of Arunachal Pradesh belongs to India and China has "no business" to name any Indian place. "Arunachal Pradesh is totally part and parcel of India. China has no business to name any of the district. I don't know why they have taken this step," Naidu, the Information and Broadcasting Minister, told a press conference here. Stressing that "every inch of the state belongs to India", the minister said that no foreign country has the right to rename any part of India. Naidu asked if anybody's name can be changed if his or her neighbour does so. The minister was responding to a query on the Chinese action of unilaterally changing the names of six places in Arunachal Pradesh. China had yesterday announced that it has "standardised" official names for six places in the northeastern state and termed the provocative move as a "legitimate action". The Chinese move came days after Beijing lodged a strong protest with India over the ... Union Minister today said "every inch" of belongs to and has "no business" to name any Indian place.

"is totally part and parcel of has no business to name any of the district. I don't know why they have taken this step," Naidu, the Information and Broadcasting Minister, told a press conference here.

Stressing that "every inch of the state belongs to India", the minister said that no foreign country has the right to rename any part of

Naidu asked if anybody's name can be changed if his or her neighbour does so.

The minister was responding to a query on the Chinese action of unilaterally changing the names of six places in

had yesterday announced that it has "standardised" official names for six places in the northeastern state and termed the provocative move as a "legitimate action".

The Chinese move came days after lodged a strong protest with over the Dalai Lama's visit to the frontier state.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

China has no business to name any Indian place: Naidu

Union Minister today said "every inch" of belongs to and has "no business" to name any Indian place.

"is totally part and parcel of has no business to name any of the district. I don't know why they have taken this step," Naidu, the Information and Broadcasting Minister, told a press conference here.

Stressing that "every inch of the state belongs to India", the minister said that no foreign country has the right to rename any part of

Naidu asked if anybody's name can be changed if his or her neighbour does so.

The minister was responding to a query on the Chinese action of unilaterally changing the names of six places in

had yesterday announced that it has "standardised" official names for six places in the northeastern state and termed the provocative move as a "legitimate action".

The Chinese move came days after lodged a strong protest with over the Dalai Lama's visit to the frontier state.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22