You are here: Home » PTI Stories » National » News
Business Standard

Hollande invokes unity at ceremony for Nice attack

AFP  |  Nice 

President Francois Hollande invoked the spirit of national unity today as he led tributes to 86 people killed in a jihadist truck attack in Nice on Bastille Day.

Today's ceremonies in the Riviera resort city had been postponed until a day after the three-month anniversary because of storms in the region.



"What was attacked on July 14 was national unity," Hollande told hundreds of victims' relatives and officials invited to the ceremony.

"It is the monstrous aim of the terrorists, to attack some in order to terrify others, to unleash violence in order to sow division... Well, I tell you, no, this evil enterprise will fail," he said.

"In some families, three generations were swept away," Hollande said, as he described "the entire nation's compassion and solidarity" for mourning relatives.

The July 14 attack saw a 31-year-old Tunisian extremist ram a 19-tonne truck into a crowd of 30,000 holiday revellers on the Promenade des Anglais seafront before police shot him dead.

More than 400 people were injured, some grievously.

The Islamic State (IS) group said the driver, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, was one of its followers.

The massacre marked a peak of brutality in a string of jihadist attacks in France over the past two years that have ramped up security fears while stoking anti-immigrant sentiment ahead of presidential elections in 2017.

Hollande's Socialist government came under fire for alleged security lapses ahead of the attack in Nice, a bastion of the rightwing opposition.

Several politicians from the right attended the ceremony including former president Nicolas Sarkozy and Alain Juppe, both candidates in the Republicans party's presidential primary next month, and far-right National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen.

Many families are still struggling to deal with their grief.

"Nice and all of France weeps for the 86 victims. Our sadness is unending," said Cindy Pellegrini, a relative of the victims, who read a text in their memory at the start of the one-hour ceremony.

And some survivors of the attack are still trying to put their lives back together.

Vincent Delhommel Desmarest, who runs a restaurant on the Promenade des Anglais, is still haunted by the bloodbath and has yet to return to work.

"You don't sleep at night. I saw the whole thing, the lorry bearing down, the mutilated, decapitated bodies, the guts," said Desmarest, leader of a victims' group.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Hollande invokes unity at ceremony for Nice attack

President Francois Hollande invoked the spirit of national unity today as he led tributes to 86 people killed in a jihadist truck attack in Nice on Bastille Day. Today's ceremonies in the Riviera resort city had been postponed until a day after the three-month anniversary because of storms in the region. "What was attacked on July 14 was national unity," Hollande told hundreds of victims' relatives and officials invited to the ceremony. "It is the monstrous aim of the terrorists, to attack some in order to terrify others, to unleash violence in order to sow division... Well, I tell you, no, this evil enterprise will fail," he said. "In some families, three generations were swept away," Hollande said, as he described "the entire nation's compassion and solidarity" for mourning relatives. The July 14 attack saw a 31-year-old Tunisian extremist ram a 19-tonne truck into a crowd of 30,000 holiday revellers on the Promenade des Anglais seafront before police shot him dead. More than ... President Francois Hollande invoked the spirit of national unity today as he led tributes to 86 people killed in a jihadist truck attack in Nice on Bastille Day.

Today's ceremonies in the Riviera resort city had been postponed until a day after the three-month anniversary because of storms in the region.

"What was attacked on July 14 was national unity," Hollande told hundreds of victims' relatives and officials invited to the ceremony.

"It is the monstrous aim of the terrorists, to attack some in order to terrify others, to unleash violence in order to sow division... Well, I tell you, no, this evil enterprise will fail," he said.

"In some families, three generations were swept away," Hollande said, as he described "the entire nation's compassion and solidarity" for mourning relatives.

The July 14 attack saw a 31-year-old Tunisian extremist ram a 19-tonne truck into a crowd of 30,000 holiday revellers on the Promenade des Anglais seafront before police shot him dead.

More than 400 people were injured, some grievously.

The Islamic State (IS) group said the driver, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, was one of its followers.

The massacre marked a peak of brutality in a string of jihadist attacks in France over the past two years that have ramped up security fears while stoking anti-immigrant sentiment ahead of presidential elections in 2017.

Hollande's Socialist government came under fire for alleged security lapses ahead of the attack in Nice, a bastion of the rightwing opposition.

Several politicians from the right attended the ceremony including former president Nicolas Sarkozy and Alain Juppe, both candidates in the Republicans party's presidential primary next month, and far-right National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen.

Many families are still struggling to deal with their grief.

"Nice and all of France weeps for the 86 victims. Our sadness is unending," said Cindy Pellegrini, a relative of the victims, who read a text in their memory at the start of the one-hour ceremony.

And some survivors of the attack are still trying to put their lives back together.

Vincent Delhommel Desmarest, who runs a restaurant on the Promenade des Anglais, is still haunted by the bloodbath and has yet to return to work.

"You don't sleep at night. I saw the whole thing, the lorry bearing down, the mutilated, decapitated bodies, the guts," said Desmarest, leader of a victims' group.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Hollande invokes unity at ceremony for Nice attack

President Francois Hollande invoked the spirit of national unity today as he led tributes to 86 people killed in a jihadist truck attack in Nice on Bastille Day.

Today's ceremonies in the Riviera resort city had been postponed until a day after the three-month anniversary because of storms in the region.

"What was attacked on July 14 was national unity," Hollande told hundreds of victims' relatives and officials invited to the ceremony.

"It is the monstrous aim of the terrorists, to attack some in order to terrify others, to unleash violence in order to sow division... Well, I tell you, no, this evil enterprise will fail," he said.

"In some families, three generations were swept away," Hollande said, as he described "the entire nation's compassion and solidarity" for mourning relatives.

The July 14 attack saw a 31-year-old Tunisian extremist ram a 19-tonne truck into a crowd of 30,000 holiday revellers on the Promenade des Anglais seafront before police shot him dead.

More than 400 people were injured, some grievously.

The Islamic State (IS) group said the driver, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, was one of its followers.

The massacre marked a peak of brutality in a string of jihadist attacks in France over the past two years that have ramped up security fears while stoking anti-immigrant sentiment ahead of presidential elections in 2017.

Hollande's Socialist government came under fire for alleged security lapses ahead of the attack in Nice, a bastion of the rightwing opposition.

Several politicians from the right attended the ceremony including former president Nicolas Sarkozy and Alain Juppe, both candidates in the Republicans party's presidential primary next month, and far-right National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen.

Many families are still struggling to deal with their grief.

"Nice and all of France weeps for the 86 victims. Our sadness is unending," said Cindy Pellegrini, a relative of the victims, who read a text in their memory at the start of the one-hour ceremony.

And some survivors of the attack are still trying to put their lives back together.

Vincent Delhommel Desmarest, who runs a restaurant on the Promenade des Anglais, is still haunted by the bloodbath and has yet to return to work.

"You don't sleep at night. I saw the whole thing, the lorry bearing down, the mutilated, decapitated bodies, the guts," said Desmarest, leader of a victims' group.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard