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Hot chocolate may be as salty as seawater: study

Press Trust of India  |  London 

Craving hot chocolate? Think again! A cup of hot chocolate may contain the same level of salt as that of seawater, a new study has warned.

Researchers, including those from Queen Mary University of in the UK, analysed about 28 food items including hot chocolate, chips, burgers and French dressing.



They found that a certain brand of hot chocolate was as salty as seawater, with 16 times more salt than the maximum target set by Public Health

Each serving is worse than eating a bag of crisps, researchers said.

Atlantic seawater contains one gramme of sodium per 100 millilitre (ml), the same as the chocolate powder analysed, 'The Telegraph' reported.

The survey also found a huge disparity in similar products. A shopping basket of everyday items could contain 57 grammes more salt depending on which brands were selected.

Most people still eat one third more than the maximum recommended intake which leads to higher blood pressure, putting strain on the heart, arteries, kidneys and brain and eventually leading to heart attacks, strokes, dementia and kidney disease, researchers said.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Hot chocolate may be as salty as seawater: study

Craving hot chocolate? Think again! A cup of hot chocolate may contain the same level of salt as that of seawater, a new UK study has warned. Researchers, including those from Queen Mary University of London in the UK, analysed about 28 food items including hot chocolate, chips, burgers and French dressing. They found that a certain brand of hot chocolate was as salty as seawater, with 16 times more salt than the maximum target set by Public Health England. Each serving is worse than eating a bag of crisps, researchers said. Atlantic seawater contains one gramme of sodium per 100 millilitre (ml), the same as the chocolate powder analysed, 'The Telegraph' reported. The survey also found a huge disparity in similar products. A shopping basket of everyday items could contain 57 grammes more salt depending on which brands were selected. Most people still eat one third more than the maximum recommended intake which leads to higher blood pressure, putting strain on the heart, ... Craving hot chocolate? Think again! A cup of hot chocolate may contain the same level of salt as that of seawater, a new study has warned.

Researchers, including those from Queen Mary University of in the UK, analysed about 28 food items including hot chocolate, chips, burgers and French dressing.

They found that a certain brand of hot chocolate was as salty as seawater, with 16 times more salt than the maximum target set by Public Health

Each serving is worse than eating a bag of crisps, researchers said.

Atlantic seawater contains one gramme of sodium per 100 millilitre (ml), the same as the chocolate powder analysed, 'The Telegraph' reported.

The survey also found a huge disparity in similar products. A shopping basket of everyday items could contain 57 grammes more salt depending on which brands were selected.

Most people still eat one third more than the maximum recommended intake which leads to higher blood pressure, putting strain on the heart, arteries, kidneys and brain and eventually leading to heart attacks, strokes, dementia and kidney disease, researchers said.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Hot chocolate may be as salty as seawater: study

Craving hot chocolate? Think again! A cup of hot chocolate may contain the same level of salt as that of seawater, a new study has warned.

Researchers, including those from Queen Mary University of in the UK, analysed about 28 food items including hot chocolate, chips, burgers and French dressing.

They found that a certain brand of hot chocolate was as salty as seawater, with 16 times more salt than the maximum target set by Public Health

Each serving is worse than eating a bag of crisps, researchers said.

Atlantic seawater contains one gramme of sodium per 100 millilitre (ml), the same as the chocolate powder analysed, 'The Telegraph' reported.

The survey also found a huge disparity in similar products. A shopping basket of everyday items could contain 57 grammes more salt depending on which brands were selected.

Most people still eat one third more than the maximum recommended intake which leads to higher blood pressure, putting strain on the heart, arteries, kidneys and brain and eventually leading to heart attacks, strokes, dementia and kidney disease, researchers said.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22