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If Islamic nations can regulate triple talaq, why can't India:

Press Trust of India  |  Patna 

Defending the Centre's stand on 'triple talaq', Minister today said when over a dozen Islamic countries were regulating the practice by enacting laws, how could it be considered wrong for a "secular" country like India.

His remarks came a day after the All Muslim Personal Board opposed the Centre's affidavit in Supreme on the practice and also boycotted the Commission's consultations on Uniform Civil Code (UCC).



"Over a dozen Islamic countries such as Pakistan, Tunisia, Morocco, and have regulated triple talaq. If Islamic countries can regulate the practice by enacting law, and it has not been found against sharia, then how can it be wrong in India, which is a secular country?" Prasad told reporters here.

The minister, however, refused to comment on the issue of Uniform Civil Code.

"The Commission is considering it and has sought views of various sections of the society. Since it is under their consideration, I have nothing to say," he maintained.

For the first time in India's constitutional history, the Centre had on October 7 opposed in the Supreme the practice of triple talaq, 'nikah halala' and polygamy among Muslims and favoured a relook on grounds of gender equality and secularism.

The Ministry, in its affidavit, referred to constitutional principles like gender equality, secularism, international covenants, religious practices and marital prevalent in various Islamic countries to drive home the point that the practice of triple talaq and polygamy needed to be adjudicated upon afresh by the apex court.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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If Islamic nations can regulate triple talaq, why can't India:

Defending the Centre's stand on 'triple talaq', Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad today said when over a dozen Islamic countries were regulating the practice by enacting laws, how could it be considered wrong for a "secular" country like India. His remarks came a day after the All India Muslim Personal Law Board opposed the Centre's affidavit in Supreme Court on the practice and also boycotted the Law Commission's consultations on Uniform Civil Code (UCC). "Over a dozen Islamic countries such as Pakistan, Tunisia, Morocco, Iran and Egypt have regulated triple talaq. If Islamic countries can regulate the practice by enacting law, and it has not been found against sharia, then how can it be wrong in India, which is a secular country?" Prasad told reporters here. The minister, however, refused to comment on the issue of Uniform Civil Code. "The Law Commission is considering it and has sought views of various sections of the society. Since it is under their consideration, I have ... Defending the Centre's stand on 'triple talaq', Minister today said when over a dozen Islamic countries were regulating the practice by enacting laws, how could it be considered wrong for a "secular" country like India.

His remarks came a day after the All Muslim Personal Board opposed the Centre's affidavit in Supreme on the practice and also boycotted the Commission's consultations on Uniform Civil Code (UCC).

"Over a dozen Islamic countries such as Pakistan, Tunisia, Morocco, and have regulated triple talaq. If Islamic countries can regulate the practice by enacting law, and it has not been found against sharia, then how can it be wrong in India, which is a secular country?" Prasad told reporters here.

The minister, however, refused to comment on the issue of Uniform Civil Code.

"The Commission is considering it and has sought views of various sections of the society. Since it is under their consideration, I have nothing to say," he maintained.

For the first time in India's constitutional history, the Centre had on October 7 opposed in the Supreme the practice of triple talaq, 'nikah halala' and polygamy among Muslims and favoured a relook on grounds of gender equality and secularism.

The Ministry, in its affidavit, referred to constitutional principles like gender equality, secularism, international covenants, religious practices and marital prevalent in various Islamic countries to drive home the point that the practice of triple talaq and polygamy needed to be adjudicated upon afresh by the apex court.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

If Islamic nations can regulate triple talaq, why can't India:

Defending the Centre's stand on 'triple talaq', Minister today said when over a dozen Islamic countries were regulating the practice by enacting laws, how could it be considered wrong for a "secular" country like India.

His remarks came a day after the All Muslim Personal Board opposed the Centre's affidavit in Supreme on the practice and also boycotted the Commission's consultations on Uniform Civil Code (UCC).

"Over a dozen Islamic countries such as Pakistan, Tunisia, Morocco, and have regulated triple talaq. If Islamic countries can regulate the practice by enacting law, and it has not been found against sharia, then how can it be wrong in India, which is a secular country?" Prasad told reporters here.

The minister, however, refused to comment on the issue of Uniform Civil Code.

"The Commission is considering it and has sought views of various sections of the society. Since it is under their consideration, I have nothing to say," he maintained.

For the first time in India's constitutional history, the Centre had on October 7 opposed in the Supreme the practice of triple talaq, 'nikah halala' and polygamy among Muslims and favoured a relook on grounds of gender equality and secularism.

The Ministry, in its affidavit, referred to constitutional principles like gender equality, secularism, international covenants, religious practices and marital prevalent in various Islamic countries to drive home the point that the practice of triple talaq and polygamy needed to be adjudicated upon afresh by the apex court.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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