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India is like my second culture: Oscar-winner Mychael Danna

Mychael Danna, the Oscar-winning composer of "Life of Pi", says is like a second culture to him and he is looking forward to meeting filmmakers in next month.

Mychael's connect comes from his wife, Aparna, besides collaborations with directors Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta on movies like "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love", "Vanity Fair", "Monsoon Wedding" and "Water".

"I definitely have a connection to the culture. I am married to an Indian and have spent many happy months in India... It's kind of my second culture and something I am very comfortable with. I treasure the films that I have done with Mira and Deepa," Mychael told PTI in an interview over phone from Los Angeles.

The 58-year-old composer, who has worked on the original soundtrack of Warner Bros' animation film "Storks" with his brother Jeff, will be in next month to attend a film festival.

"I will attend the film festival. I am going to be a part of the jury. I will be watching many Indian films and meeting directors. I will certainly have a great overview of what is current in right now... I am looking forward to that," says Mychael when asked whether he would like to work in Bollywood.

The Canadian composer duo loved working on "Storks", which released in today, as it was something that they could share with their children.

"We have worked in all kind of genres for over 25 years. We both have kids. There is something appealing about a film that you can enjoy with your children.

"It's important to work on films that are positive and life affirming. 'Storks' is wonderful and in true tradition, it is goofy and fun and at the same time warm and moving."

Jeff, a frequent collaborator with his brother, says they have been working together since they were children so there is an ease.

"It's very natural for us as we have been doing this since we were kids. We believe that two heads are better than one if they are in the same place and ours are. These films need enormous amount of work in a really short time. If there are two people at the wheel pushing hard, it is going to be better. It's pragmatic and has worked out really well for us."

The target audience of "Storks" may be children but Jeff says they brought a "mature sensibility" to the soundtrack.

"The story often suggests the level of sophistication needed in the music. We knew there had to be a side of the score that had to be animated, energetic, strenuous and lot of fun but also needed genuine emotion.

"So, we could go crazy and acrobatic with the music at one moment and very heartfelt and emotional at the other moment. It was just about honouring the story in the best possible way.
For the composers, the best part of the job is being able to experience different cultures and world. They also love the fact that they can be together.

"The fun thing for us is that we get to submerge in different worlds, it's like temporary incarnation. At one moment you are working in this art-deco world of 'Storks' and then you work on a movie like 'Life of Pi' where it's a different kind of world.

"Then you move on to different places and different historical periods. You get to work with fabulously talented musicians from different cultures. It is a wonderful career that way. It's kind of a transient life but fun. You also get to work with your brother."

Mychael says there are times when they fight and compete but they love the fact that they can be together despite their demanding jobs.

"We work so many hours, we probably don't see each other very often unless we are working together... Sometimes we fight and compete and do all those things that brothers do but that's part of the process. (Working together) always makes the project better so that it can live up to a higher level."

Mychael and 51-year-old Jeff, who last worked on animated film "The Good Dinosaur", say it is more exciting to be a part of animated films as the whole thing comes alive slowly from page to animation.

"An animated film is presented to a composer like a radio play where actors record their part... These voices are shown to you without animation.

"You have just the pencil sketches of the characters but then they start replacing it with animation and you see it come alive as colour and detail is added. The great animators and directors help you with what the scene is going to have visually and emotionally.

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Business Standard

India is like my second culture: Oscar-winner Mychael Danna

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Mychael Danna, the Oscar-winning composer of "Life of Pi", says is like a second culture to him and he is looking forward to meeting filmmakers in next month.

Mychael's connect comes from his wife, Aparna, besides collaborations with directors Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta on movies like "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love", "Vanity Fair", "Monsoon Wedding" and "Water".



"I definitely have a connection to the culture. I am married to an Indian and have spent many happy months in India... It's kind of my second culture and something I am very comfortable with. I treasure the films that I have done with Mira and Deepa," Mychael told PTI in an interview over phone from Los Angeles.

The 58-year-old composer, who has worked on the original soundtrack of Warner Bros' animation film "Storks" with his brother Jeff, will be in next month to attend a film festival.

"I will attend the film festival. I am going to be a part of the jury. I will be watching many Indian films and meeting directors. I will certainly have a great overview of what is current in right now... I am looking forward to that," says Mychael when asked whether he would like to work in Bollywood.

The Canadian composer duo loved working on "Storks", which released in today, as it was something that they could share with their children.

"We have worked in all kind of genres for over 25 years. We both have kids. There is something appealing about a film that you can enjoy with your children.

"It's important to work on films that are positive and life affirming. 'Storks' is wonderful and in true tradition, it is goofy and fun and at the same time warm and moving."

Jeff, a frequent collaborator with his brother, says they have been working together since they were children so there is an ease.

"It's very natural for us as we have been doing this since we were kids. We believe that two heads are better than one if they are in the same place and ours are. These films need enormous amount of work in a really short time. If there are two people at the wheel pushing hard, it is going to be better. It's pragmatic and has worked out really well for us."

The target audience of "Storks" may be children but Jeff says they brought a "mature sensibility" to the soundtrack.

"The story often suggests the level of sophistication needed in the music. We knew there had to be a side of the score that had to be animated, energetic, strenuous and lot of fun but also needed genuine emotion.

"So, we could go crazy and acrobatic with the music at one moment and very heartfelt and emotional at the other moment. It was just about honouring the story in the best possible way.
For the composers, the best part of the job is being able to experience different cultures and world. They also love the fact that they can be together.

"The fun thing for us is that we get to submerge in different worlds, it's like temporary incarnation. At one moment you are working in this art-deco world of 'Storks' and then you work on a movie like 'Life of Pi' where it's a different kind of world.

"Then you move on to different places and different historical periods. You get to work with fabulously talented musicians from different cultures. It is a wonderful career that way. It's kind of a transient life but fun. You also get to work with your brother."

Mychael says there are times when they fight and compete but they love the fact that they can be together despite their demanding jobs.

"We work so many hours, we probably don't see each other very often unless we are working together... Sometimes we fight and compete and do all those things that brothers do but that's part of the process. (Working together) always makes the project better so that it can live up to a higher level."

Mychael and 51-year-old Jeff, who last worked on animated film "The Good Dinosaur", say it is more exciting to be a part of animated films as the whole thing comes alive slowly from page to animation.

"An animated film is presented to a composer like a radio play where actors record their part... These voices are shown to you without animation.

"You have just the pencil sketches of the characters but then they start replacing it with animation and you see it come alive as colour and detail is added. The great animators and directors help you with what the scene is going to have visually and emotionally.

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India is like my second culture: Oscar-winner Mychael Danna

Mychael Danna, the Oscar-winning composer of "Life of Pi", says India is like a second culture to him and he is looking forward to meeting Bollywood filmmakers in Mumbai next month. Mychael's India connect comes from his wife, Aparna, besides collaborations with directors Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta on movies like "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love", "Vanity Fair", "Monsoon Wedding" and "Water". "I definitely have a connection to the culture. I am married to an Indian and have spent many happy months in India... It's kind of my second culture and something I am very comfortable with. I treasure the films that I have done with Mira and Deepa," Mychael told PTI in an interview over phone from Los Angeles. The 58-year-old composer, who has worked on the original soundtrack of Warner Bros' animation film "Storks" with his brother Jeff, will be in India next month to attend a film festival. "I will attend the Mumbai film festival. I am going to be a part of the jury. I will be watching many ... Mychael Danna, the Oscar-winning composer of "Life of Pi", says is like a second culture to him and he is looking forward to meeting filmmakers in next month.

Mychael's connect comes from his wife, Aparna, besides collaborations with directors Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta on movies like "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love", "Vanity Fair", "Monsoon Wedding" and "Water".

"I definitely have a connection to the culture. I am married to an Indian and have spent many happy months in India... It's kind of my second culture and something I am very comfortable with. I treasure the films that I have done with Mira and Deepa," Mychael told PTI in an interview over phone from Los Angeles.

The 58-year-old composer, who has worked on the original soundtrack of Warner Bros' animation film "Storks" with his brother Jeff, will be in next month to attend a film festival.

"I will attend the film festival. I am going to be a part of the jury. I will be watching many Indian films and meeting directors. I will certainly have a great overview of what is current in right now... I am looking forward to that," says Mychael when asked whether he would like to work in Bollywood.

The Canadian composer duo loved working on "Storks", which released in today, as it was something that they could share with their children.

"We have worked in all kind of genres for over 25 years. We both have kids. There is something appealing about a film that you can enjoy with your children.

"It's important to work on films that are positive and life affirming. 'Storks' is wonderful and in true tradition, it is goofy and fun and at the same time warm and moving."

Jeff, a frequent collaborator with his brother, says they have been working together since they were children so there is an ease.

"It's very natural for us as we have been doing this since we were kids. We believe that two heads are better than one if they are in the same place and ours are. These films need enormous amount of work in a really short time. If there are two people at the wheel pushing hard, it is going to be better. It's pragmatic and has worked out really well for us."

The target audience of "Storks" may be children but Jeff says they brought a "mature sensibility" to the soundtrack.

"The story often suggests the level of sophistication needed in the music. We knew there had to be a side of the score that had to be animated, energetic, strenuous and lot of fun but also needed genuine emotion.

"So, we could go crazy and acrobatic with the music at one moment and very heartfelt and emotional at the other moment. It was just about honouring the story in the best possible way.
For the composers, the best part of the job is being able to experience different cultures and world. They also love the fact that they can be together.

"The fun thing for us is that we get to submerge in different worlds, it's like temporary incarnation. At one moment you are working in this art-deco world of 'Storks' and then you work on a movie like 'Life of Pi' where it's a different kind of world.

"Then you move on to different places and different historical periods. You get to work with fabulously talented musicians from different cultures. It is a wonderful career that way. It's kind of a transient life but fun. You also get to work with your brother."

Mychael says there are times when they fight and compete but they love the fact that they can be together despite their demanding jobs.

"We work so many hours, we probably don't see each other very often unless we are working together... Sometimes we fight and compete and do all those things that brothers do but that's part of the process. (Working together) always makes the project better so that it can live up to a higher level."

Mychael and 51-year-old Jeff, who last worked on animated film "The Good Dinosaur", say it is more exciting to be a part of animated films as the whole thing comes alive slowly from page to animation.

"An animated film is presented to a composer like a radio play where actors record their part... These voices are shown to you without animation.

"You have just the pencil sketches of the characters but then they start replacing it with animation and you see it come alive as colour and detail is added. The great animators and directors help you with what the scene is going to have visually and emotionally.
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