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Indian-origin nurse gets anti-noise order against loud music

Press Trust of India  |  London 

A 51-year-old Indian-origin nurse has been handed a noise abatement order after residents in north-east complained about her playing loud dance music.

Sarina Saiger, from Ireshopeburn village in County Durham was served the order by Durham County Council after the neighbours complained.



She had fought the order, but her case was dismissed at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates' this week, leaving her with an estimated 8,000-pound legal bill.

She now plans to appeal the decision further.

"I am unable to comment on matters which will be the subject of an appeal before the crown court," she said.

Saiger, who started as a nurse and then studied for a degree and PhD in nursing to become a nursing director at the UK's state-funded National Health Service (NHS), denied that she was responsible for the music, claiming she was not present on several occasions when it was played.

But the did not agree with her argument and ordered her to pay legal costs.

"We are pleased that the agreed we were right to serve the abatement notice. We don't want to stop anyone enjoying themselves in their own home but no-one should have to live with excessively loud music from their neighbours," Joanne Waller, head of environment, health and consumer protection at the council said after the hearing.

"Residents can be assured we will continue to investigate all complaints of noise disturbance and that we will take appropriate action where we find a nuisance," Waller said.

According to the 'Northern Echo', eight witnesses, including the environmental health officers, nearby residents and occupants of a caravan park, gave evidence against and three witnesses, including two of neighbours, gave evidence on behalf of Saiger.

The also played recordings of the music and heard it had mainly been played at the weekend.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Indian-origin nurse gets anti-noise order against loud music

A 51-year-old Indian-origin nurse has been handed a noise abatement order after residents in north-east England complained about her playing loud dance music. Sarina Saiger, from Ireshopeburn village in County Durham was served the order by Durham County Council after the neighbours complained. She had fought the order, but her case was dismissed at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates' Court this week, leaving her with an estimated 8,000-pound legal bill. She now plans to appeal the decision further. "I am unable to comment on matters which will be the subject of an appeal before the crown court," she said. Saiger, who started as a nurse and then studied for a degree and PhD in nursing to become a nursing director at the UK's state-funded National Health Service (NHS), denied that she was responsible for the music, claiming she was not present on several occasions when it was played. But the court did not agree with her argument and ordered her to pay legal costs. "We are pleased that ... A 51-year-old Indian-origin nurse has been handed a noise abatement order after residents in north-east complained about her playing loud dance music.

Sarina Saiger, from Ireshopeburn village in County Durham was served the order by Durham County Council after the neighbours complained.

She had fought the order, but her case was dismissed at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates' this week, leaving her with an estimated 8,000-pound legal bill.

She now plans to appeal the decision further.

"I am unable to comment on matters which will be the subject of an appeal before the crown court," she said.

Saiger, who started as a nurse and then studied for a degree and PhD in nursing to become a nursing director at the UK's state-funded National Health Service (NHS), denied that she was responsible for the music, claiming she was not present on several occasions when it was played.

But the did not agree with her argument and ordered her to pay legal costs.

"We are pleased that the agreed we were right to serve the abatement notice. We don't want to stop anyone enjoying themselves in their own home but no-one should have to live with excessively loud music from their neighbours," Joanne Waller, head of environment, health and consumer protection at the council said after the hearing.

"Residents can be assured we will continue to investigate all complaints of noise disturbance and that we will take appropriate action where we find a nuisance," Waller said.

According to the 'Northern Echo', eight witnesses, including the environmental health officers, nearby residents and occupants of a caravan park, gave evidence against and three witnesses, including two of neighbours, gave evidence on behalf of Saiger.

The also played recordings of the music and heard it had mainly been played at the weekend.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Business Standard
177 22

Indian-origin nurse gets anti-noise order against loud music

A 51-year-old Indian-origin nurse has been handed a noise abatement order after residents in north-east complained about her playing loud dance music.

Sarina Saiger, from Ireshopeburn village in County Durham was served the order by Durham County Council after the neighbours complained.

She had fought the order, but her case was dismissed at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates' this week, leaving her with an estimated 8,000-pound legal bill.

She now plans to appeal the decision further.

"I am unable to comment on matters which will be the subject of an appeal before the crown court," she said.

Saiger, who started as a nurse and then studied for a degree and PhD in nursing to become a nursing director at the UK's state-funded National Health Service (NHS), denied that she was responsible for the music, claiming she was not present on several occasions when it was played.

But the did not agree with her argument and ordered her to pay legal costs.

"We are pleased that the agreed we were right to serve the abatement notice. We don't want to stop anyone enjoying themselves in their own home but no-one should have to live with excessively loud music from their neighbours," Joanne Waller, head of environment, health and consumer protection at the council said after the hearing.

"Residents can be assured we will continue to investigate all complaints of noise disturbance and that we will take appropriate action where we find a nuisance," Waller said.

According to the 'Northern Echo', eight witnesses, including the environmental health officers, nearby residents and occupants of a caravan park, gave evidence against and three witnesses, including two of neighbours, gave evidence on behalf of Saiger.

The also played recordings of the music and heard it had mainly been played at the weekend.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22