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Japan cabinet ministers visit controversial war shrine

AFP  |  Tokyo 

Two Japanese cabinet ministers visited a controversial war shrine today, after a mass visit by lawmakers angered and which see it as a painful reminder of Tokyo's aggressive past.

The ministers -- internal affairs chief Sanae Takaichi and Katsunobu Kato, in charge of womens' empowerment -- are close to conservative Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who did not visit the Yasukuni shrine during this year's four-day autumn festival.



Abe, often criticised for what some see as revisionist views on Japan's wartime record, sent a ritual offering to the shrine instead.

He has not gone to the site in central Tokyo since late 2013 in an apparent attempt to ease diplomatic tensions.

Yesterday a group of about 85 legislators arrived at the leafy site for an annual pilgrimage, sparking a rebuke from and Seoul, which called on them to show "humble self-reflection and sincere remorse for Japan's past wrongdoings".

Yasukuni honours millions of Japanese war dead, but also senior military and political figures convicted of war crimes after World War II.

The indigenous Shinto religious shrine has for decades been a flashpoint for criticism by countries that suffered from Japan's colonialism and aggression in the first half of the 20th century, including and Korea.

Abe and other nationalists say Yasukuni is a place to remember fallen soldiers. They compare it to Arlington National Cemetery in the United States.

His visit in 2013 to mark his first year in power sparked fury in and Seoul and earned a diplomatic rebuke from close ally the United States which said it was "disappointed".

Ave has since refrained from going, sending ritual offerings instead.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Japan cabinet ministers visit controversial war shrine

Two Japanese cabinet ministers visited a controversial war shrine today, after a mass visit by lawmakers angered China and South Korea which see it as a painful reminder of Tokyo's aggressive past. The ministers -- internal affairs chief Sanae Takaichi and Katsunobu Kato, in charge of womens' empowerment -- are close to conservative Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who did not visit the Yasukuni shrine during this year's four-day autumn festival. Abe, often criticised for what some see as revisionist views on Japan's wartime record, sent a ritual offering to the shrine instead. He has not gone to the site in central Tokyo since late 2013 in an apparent attempt to ease diplomatic tensions. Yesterday a group of about 85 legislators arrived at the leafy site for an annual pilgrimage, sparking a rebuke from Beijing and Seoul, which called on them to show "humble self-reflection and sincere remorse for Japan's past wrongdoings". Yasukuni honours millions of Japanese war dead, but also ... Two Japanese cabinet ministers visited a controversial war shrine today, after a mass visit by lawmakers angered and which see it as a painful reminder of Tokyo's aggressive past.

The ministers -- internal affairs chief Sanae Takaichi and Katsunobu Kato, in charge of womens' empowerment -- are close to conservative Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who did not visit the Yasukuni shrine during this year's four-day autumn festival.

Abe, often criticised for what some see as revisionist views on Japan's wartime record, sent a ritual offering to the shrine instead.

He has not gone to the site in central Tokyo since late 2013 in an apparent attempt to ease diplomatic tensions.

Yesterday a group of about 85 legislators arrived at the leafy site for an annual pilgrimage, sparking a rebuke from and Seoul, which called on them to show "humble self-reflection and sincere remorse for Japan's past wrongdoings".

Yasukuni honours millions of Japanese war dead, but also senior military and political figures convicted of war crimes after World War II.

The indigenous Shinto religious shrine has for decades been a flashpoint for criticism by countries that suffered from Japan's colonialism and aggression in the first half of the 20th century, including and Korea.

Abe and other nationalists say Yasukuni is a place to remember fallen soldiers. They compare it to Arlington National Cemetery in the United States.

His visit in 2013 to mark his first year in power sparked fury in and Seoul and earned a diplomatic rebuke from close ally the United States which said it was "disappointed".

Ave has since refrained from going, sending ritual offerings instead.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Japan cabinet ministers visit controversial war shrine

Two Japanese cabinet ministers visited a controversial war shrine today, after a mass visit by lawmakers angered and which see it as a painful reminder of Tokyo's aggressive past.

The ministers -- internal affairs chief Sanae Takaichi and Katsunobu Kato, in charge of womens' empowerment -- are close to conservative Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who did not visit the Yasukuni shrine during this year's four-day autumn festival.

Abe, often criticised for what some see as revisionist views on Japan's wartime record, sent a ritual offering to the shrine instead.

He has not gone to the site in central Tokyo since late 2013 in an apparent attempt to ease diplomatic tensions.

Yesterday a group of about 85 legislators arrived at the leafy site for an annual pilgrimage, sparking a rebuke from and Seoul, which called on them to show "humble self-reflection and sincere remorse for Japan's past wrongdoings".

Yasukuni honours millions of Japanese war dead, but also senior military and political figures convicted of war crimes after World War II.

The indigenous Shinto religious shrine has for decades been a flashpoint for criticism by countries that suffered from Japan's colonialism and aggression in the first half of the 20th century, including and Korea.

Abe and other nationalists say Yasukuni is a place to remember fallen soldiers. They compare it to Arlington National Cemetery in the United States.

His visit in 2013 to mark his first year in power sparked fury in and Seoul and earned a diplomatic rebuke from close ally the United States which said it was "disappointed".

Ave has since refrained from going, sending ritual offerings instead.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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