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Kesha opens up on living in self-doubt

Press Trust of India  |  London 

Singer Kesha reveals there was a time when she "almost died" after suffering from self-doubt and a lack of self-confidence.

The "Tik Tok" hitmaker says a lack of self-confidence can send someone into a spiral of negative feelings, while admitting that it is something that nearly happened to her in the past, reported Femalefirst.



"If you feel a certain way about yourself, your body - it can kill you. I almost died. I came closer than I ever knew. By the time I entered rehab, they were surprised I hadn't had a stroke - because I hadn't consumed enough.

"I'm not ashamed anymore. It's emotional because it's a deep-rooted disease. It can really affect your self-worth," she says.

Speaking at Refinery 29's Reclaiming the Internet SXSW talk, she adds, "I try to limit myself in terms of reading comments because there can be a million positive ones, but I always gravitate towards the one negative one. I hold on to that and I internalise it and I know it's an unhealthy habit. I've stopped reading comments.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Kesha opens up on living in self-doubt

Singer Kesha reveals there was a time when she "almost died" after suffering from self-doubt and a lack of self-confidence. The "Tik Tok" hitmaker says a lack of self-confidence can send someone into a spiral of negative feelings, while admitting that it is something that nearly happened to her in the past, reported Femalefirst. "If you feel a certain way about yourself, your body - it can kill you. I almost died. I came closer than I ever knew. By the time I entered rehab, they were surprised I hadn't had a stroke - because I hadn't consumed enough. "I'm not ashamed anymore. It's emotional because it's a deep-rooted disease. It can really affect your self-worth," she says. Speaking at Refinery 29's Reclaiming the Internet SXSW talk, she adds, "I try to limit myself in terms of reading comments because there can be a million positive ones, but I always gravitate towards the one negative one. I hold on to that and I internalise it and I know it's an unhealthy habit. I've stopped ... Singer Kesha reveals there was a time when she "almost died" after suffering from self-doubt and a lack of self-confidence.

The "Tik Tok" hitmaker says a lack of self-confidence can send someone into a spiral of negative feelings, while admitting that it is something that nearly happened to her in the past, reported Femalefirst.

"If you feel a certain way about yourself, your body - it can kill you. I almost died. I came closer than I ever knew. By the time I entered rehab, they were surprised I hadn't had a stroke - because I hadn't consumed enough.

"I'm not ashamed anymore. It's emotional because it's a deep-rooted disease. It can really affect your self-worth," she says.

Speaking at Refinery 29's Reclaiming the Internet SXSW talk, she adds, "I try to limit myself in terms of reading comments because there can be a million positive ones, but I always gravitate towards the one negative one. I hold on to that and I internalise it and I know it's an unhealthy habit. I've stopped reading comments.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Kesha opens up on living in self-doubt

Singer Kesha reveals there was a time when she "almost died" after suffering from self-doubt and a lack of self-confidence.

The "Tik Tok" hitmaker says a lack of self-confidence can send someone into a spiral of negative feelings, while admitting that it is something that nearly happened to her in the past, reported Femalefirst.

"If you feel a certain way about yourself, your body - it can kill you. I almost died. I came closer than I ever knew. By the time I entered rehab, they were surprised I hadn't had a stroke - because I hadn't consumed enough.

"I'm not ashamed anymore. It's emotional because it's a deep-rooted disease. It can really affect your self-worth," she says.

Speaking at Refinery 29's Reclaiming the Internet SXSW talk, she adds, "I try to limit myself in terms of reading comments because there can be a million positive ones, but I always gravitate towards the one negative one. I hold on to that and I internalise it and I know it's an unhealthy habit. I've stopped reading comments.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22