Business Standard

Lovers to match genes, not hearts

Press Trust of India  |  London 

Scientists believe that since the cost of genetic sequencing is falling so rapidly, within five to ten years it will be very common for young people to pay for a read-out of their entire genetic code and choose a compatible partner.

The desire to have healthy babies will also lead people to request and see the genetic blueprint of any prospective long-term partner, Professor Armand Leroi, a leading scientist at Imperial College London said.

Based on the information gathered from the genetic blueprint, the couple could then use In-Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) to weed out babies with incurable diseases, Leroi told a major science conference in Dublin.

According to Leroi, it is unlikely that people will have the 'luxury' of using the technology to design babies by intellect or eye colour and instead they will focus on stopping the genetic diseases, the Daily Mail reported.

Professor Leroi told the Euro-science Open Forum 2012 that in some ways eugenics, the science of improving the genetic composition of a population, is already here, with tens of thousands of unborn babies with Down

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Lovers to match genes, not hearts

Couples in future can choose their partners based on the compatibility of their genes instead of just settling for someone or falling in love, say scientists.

Scientists believe that since the cost of genetic sequencing is falling so rapidly, within five to ten years it will be very common for young people to pay for a read-out of their entire genetic code and choose a compatible partner.

The desire to have healthy babies will also lead people to request and see the genetic blueprint of any prospective long-term partner, Professor Armand Leroi, a leading scientist at Imperial College London said.

Based on the information gathered from the genetic blueprint, the couple could then use In-Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) to weed out babies with incurable diseases, Leroi told a major science conference in Dublin.

According to Leroi, it is unlikely that people will have the 'luxury' of using the technology to design babies by intellect or eye colour and instead they will focus on stopping the genetic diseases, the Daily Mail reported.

Professor Leroi told the Euro-science Open Forum 2012 that in some ways eugenics, the science of improving the genetic composition of a population, is already here, with tens of thousands of unborn babies with Down image