You are here: Home » PTI Stories » National » News

New York seizes USD 4.5 mn worth of elephant ivory items

The New York authorities seized USD 4.5 million worth of illegal elephant ivory items in what they described as the biggest bust in the state's history, officials said.

Ivory items put on display for reporters included scores of statuettes, a carved column, two pairs of tusks and a chess set.

Two pairs of tusks -- an adult elephant's and another from a young adult -- were valued at USD 200,000 and USD 150,000, respectively.

The ivory came from at least 12 slain animals, officials said.

"We are going to dry up... A market that only fuels the slaughter of elephants," Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance said. "It is inexcusable, it is immoral."

New York City is a hub of illegal elephant ivory trade, ahead of California and Hawaii, said Basil Seggos, head of the state's Department of Environmental Conservation. His office participated in the probe.

"This type of behavior will no longer be tolerated," he said.

New York was one of the first states in 2014 to adopt strict laws banning ivory sales to protect elephants, Vance said.

Undercover police posing as buyers seized the latest items at a midtown Manhattan art and antiquities store.

Although officials said they were not certain where the items came from, they did say most ivory craftsmen are found in China.

It is illegal to sell elephant ivory without a special license. But New York's rules were tightened so much in 2014 that they effectively banned ivory sales except under limited circumstances.

Although the store had a license, it expired two years ago and could not be renewed because of the new restrictions.

The store owners were indicted on charges of illegal commercialisation of wildlife. They face hefty fines and up to three years in prison.

The United States and China, among the world's biggest ivory consumers, have agreed to enact near-total bans on their domestic markets.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) banned the international commercial trade in African elephant ivory in 1989.

But illegal poaching of endangered elephants for their tusks persists at dangerous levels.

Savanna elephants have declined at a rate of 27,000 -- or eight percent -- per year, with a total of 144,000 lost in less than a decade.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

New York seizes USD 4.5 mn worth of elephant ivory items

AFP  |  New York 

The New York authorities seized USD 4.5 million worth of illegal elephant ivory items in what they described as the biggest bust in the state's history, officials said.

Ivory items put on display for reporters included scores of statuettes, a carved column, two pairs of tusks and a chess set.



Two pairs of tusks -- an adult elephant's and another from a young adult -- were valued at USD 200,000 and USD 150,000, respectively.

The ivory came from at least 12 slain animals, officials said.

"We are going to dry up... A market that only fuels the slaughter of elephants," Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance said. "It is inexcusable, it is immoral."

New York City is a hub of illegal elephant ivory trade, ahead of California and Hawaii, said Basil Seggos, head of the state's Department of Environmental Conservation. His office participated in the probe.

"This type of behavior will no longer be tolerated," he said.

New York was one of the first states in 2014 to adopt strict laws banning ivory sales to protect elephants, Vance said.

Undercover police posing as buyers seized the latest items at a midtown Manhattan art and antiquities store.

Although officials said they were not certain where the items came from, they did say most ivory craftsmen are found in China.

It is illegal to sell elephant ivory without a special license. But New York's rules were tightened so much in 2014 that they effectively banned ivory sales except under limited circumstances.

Although the store had a license, it expired two years ago and could not be renewed because of the new restrictions.

The store owners were indicted on charges of illegal commercialisation of wildlife. They face hefty fines and up to three years in prison.

The United States and China, among the world's biggest ivory consumers, have agreed to enact near-total bans on their domestic markets.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) banned the international commercial trade in African elephant ivory in 1989.

But illegal poaching of endangered elephants for their tusks persists at dangerous levels.

Savanna elephants have declined at a rate of 27,000 -- or eight percent -- per year, with a total of 144,000 lost in less than a decade.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

New York seizes USD 4.5 mn worth of elephant ivory items

The New York authorities seized USD 4.5 million worth of illegal elephant ivory items in what they described as the biggest bust in the state's history, officials said. Ivory items put on display for reporters included scores of statuettes, a carved column, two pairs of tusks and a chess set. Two pairs of tusks -- an adult elephant's and another from a young adult -- were valued at USD 200,000 and USD 150,000, respectively. The ivory came from at least 12 slain animals, officials said. "We are going to dry up... A market that only fuels the slaughter of elephants," Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance said. "It is inexcusable, it is immoral." New York City is a hub of illegal elephant ivory trade, ahead of California and Hawaii, said Basil Seggos, head of the state's Department of Environmental Conservation. His office participated in the probe. "This type of behavior will no longer be tolerated," he said. New York was one of the first states in 2014 to adopt strict laws ... The New York authorities seized USD 4.5 million worth of illegal elephant ivory items in what they described as the biggest bust in the state's history, officials said.

Ivory items put on display for reporters included scores of statuettes, a carved column, two pairs of tusks and a chess set.

Two pairs of tusks -- an adult elephant's and another from a young adult -- were valued at USD 200,000 and USD 150,000, respectively.

The ivory came from at least 12 slain animals, officials said.

"We are going to dry up... A market that only fuels the slaughter of elephants," Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance said. "It is inexcusable, it is immoral."

New York City is a hub of illegal elephant ivory trade, ahead of California and Hawaii, said Basil Seggos, head of the state's Department of Environmental Conservation. His office participated in the probe.

"This type of behavior will no longer be tolerated," he said.

New York was one of the first states in 2014 to adopt strict laws banning ivory sales to protect elephants, Vance said.

Undercover police posing as buyers seized the latest items at a midtown Manhattan art and antiquities store.

Although officials said they were not certain where the items came from, they did say most ivory craftsmen are found in China.

It is illegal to sell elephant ivory without a special license. But New York's rules were tightened so much in 2014 that they effectively banned ivory sales except under limited circumstances.

Although the store had a license, it expired two years ago and could not be renewed because of the new restrictions.

The store owners were indicted on charges of illegal commercialisation of wildlife. They face hefty fines and up to three years in prison.

The United States and China, among the world's biggest ivory consumers, have agreed to enact near-total bans on their domestic markets.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) banned the international commercial trade in African elephant ivory in 1989.

But illegal poaching of endangered elephants for their tusks persists at dangerous levels.

Savanna elephants have declined at a rate of 27,000 -- or eight percent -- per year, with a total of 144,000 lost in less than a decade.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard