Now, 'electronic diaper' for elderly

An Australian company has developed an 'electronic diaper' which it says can detect urinary discharge to help elderly people with incontinence.

The small electronic sensor is placed on an elderly's incontinence pad to reduce the unpleasantness of incontinence management in nursing homes and make it less expensive.

Analysis of the data from the sensor developed by the firm Simavita, using special computer software, enables carers to build an accurate profile of the elderly's continence - a "live bladder chart".

The chart is used as an aid for an aged person's future care, AAP agency reported.

It is generated during a 72-hour assessment period that the elderly persons undergo when they enter long-term care facilities.

The chart helps a carer determine what makes the resident want to discharge urine, the report said.

Present manual methods of incontinence management require carers to check and change a resident's incontinence pads every few hours.

This is often unnecessary and provides no evidence-based data.

image
Business Standard
177 22
Business Standard

Now, 'electronic diaper' for elderly

Press Trust of India  |  Melbourne 



An Australian company has developed an 'electronic diaper' which it says can detect urinary discharge to help elderly people with incontinence.

The small electronic sensor is placed on an elderly's incontinence pad to reduce the unpleasantness of incontinence management in nursing homes and make it less expensive.



Analysis of the data from the sensor developed by the firm Simavita, using special computer software, enables carers to build an accurate profile of the elderly's continence - a "live bladder chart".

The chart is used as an aid for an aged person's future care, AAP agency reported.

It is generated during a 72-hour assessment period that the elderly persons undergo when they enter long-term care facilities.

The chart helps a carer determine what makes the resident want to discharge urine, the report said.

Present manual methods of incontinence management require carers to check and change a resident's incontinence pads every few hours.

This is often unnecessary and provides no evidence-based data.

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Now, 'electronic diaper' for elderly

An Australian company has developed an 'electronic diaper' which it says can detect urinary discharge to help elderly people with incontinence. The small electronic sensor is placed on an elderly's incontinence pad to reduce the unpleasantness of incontinence management in nursing homes and make it less expensive. Analysis of the data from the sensor developed by the firm Simavita, using special computer software, enables carers to build an accurate profile of the elderly's continence - a "live bladder chart". The chart is used as an aid for an aged person's future care, AAP news agency reported. It is generated during a 72-hour assessment period that the elderly persons undergo when they enter long-term care facilities. The chart helps a carer determine what makes the resident want to discharge urine, the report said. Present manual methods of incontinence management require carers to check and change a resident's incontinence pads every few hours. This is often unnecessary ... An Australian company has developed an 'electronic diaper' which it says can detect urinary discharge to help elderly people with incontinence.

The small electronic sensor is placed on an elderly's incontinence pad to reduce the unpleasantness of incontinence management in nursing homes and make it less expensive.

Analysis of the data from the sensor developed by the firm Simavita, using special computer software, enables carers to build an accurate profile of the elderly's continence - a "live bladder chart".

The chart is used as an aid for an aged person's future care, AAP agency reported.

It is generated during a 72-hour assessment period that the elderly persons undergo when they enter long-term care facilities.

The chart helps a carer determine what makes the resident want to discharge urine, the report said.

Present manual methods of incontinence management require carers to check and change a resident's incontinence pads every few hours.

This is often unnecessary and provides no evidence-based data.
image
Business Standard
177 22

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