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Our fashion not just about unbelievable yards of fabric: Amit

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Designer Amit Aggarwal says although mesmerising in its approach and culture, Indian fashion has more to offer than the traditional saree.

Amit, who will be showcasing his couture line for autumn winter 2017 at the grand finale of Amazon Fashion Week with his mentor Tarun Tahiliani, feels there is a need to contemporise the Indian textiles.



"There is a hue and cry about 'Made in India'. But when we are trying to save our heritage and put as a real contender on the world map, we should also look at the advancements in the industry.

"I don't think Indian fashion is just about weaving unbelievable yards of fabric, which cannot be converted into international fashion," says Amit.

The designer says his collection will showcase a "fresh, new look" where "organic or hand-woven textiles are mixed with industrial waste".

"We are connected to our heritage in multiple ways through our families, parents or the history of the bygone years. We have plugged this theme with the bridal wear for the first time on the runway. It is about saving and giving a new language to old hand-woven textiles."

Talking about the equation he shares with his mentor, Amit says although he has worked under Tahiliani, he has grown his own aesthetics.

He says the collection celebrates the blending together of their individual styles.

"We both love jewelled tones for a quintessential trousseau look and that's where we tie in together. Tarun also enjoys the fact that I play a lot with structure and volume and yet keep femininity in place."

Amit says the collection that he will showcase with Tahiliani is a great blend of everyday wear for a woman to hi-end pieces to bridal trousseau.

"It is basically the entire journey of a woman's wardrobe. There is not just heavily embellished couture but also easy separate shirts that you can pair up with a beautiful lehenga skirt.

"There is also a choice where a beautiful sari can be worn with a moulded corset or a pair of pants. You can wear it like a suit as well, then throw in a jacket. You actually break it down... There's an option for a million things in the collection," says Amit.

The shoes and jewellery are like the icing on the cake for every fashion designer's collection. This time Aprajita Toor's footwear is going to light up the runway for Amit's show.

"The runway is going to be a semi-reflective surface. We wanted the models to appear as if they are floating in the air. So, we got the shoes made out of glass - transparent shoe with a 'dori' to keep it in place.

"The jewellery by Misho is beautiful and in curvy little forms which look really eclectic. It's a great addition to the show."

While the showstopper for the D-Day is expected to be a surprise, illustrious names from the industry such as fashion entrepreneurs Kalyani Chawla and Pernia Qureshi, editors like Nandini Bhalla will walk the ramp to support the designers on the grand finale on March 18 at Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Our fashion not just about unbelievable yards of fabric: Amit

Designer Amit Aggarwal says although mesmerising in its approach and culture, Indian fashion has more to offer than the traditional saree. Amit, who will be showcasing his couture line for autumn winter 2017 at the grand finale of Amazon India Fashion Week with his mentor Tarun Tahiliani, feels there is a need to contemporise the Indian textiles. "There is a hue and cry about 'Made in India'. But when we are trying to save our heritage and put India as a real contender on the world map, we should also look at the advancements in the industry. "I don't think Indian fashion is just about weaving unbelievable yards of fabric, which cannot be converted into international fashion," says Amit. The designer says his collection will showcase a "fresh, new look" where "organic or hand-woven textiles are mixed with industrial waste". "We are connected to our heritage in multiple ways through our families, parents or the history of the bygone years. We have plugged this theme with the ... Designer Amit Aggarwal says although mesmerising in its approach and culture, Indian fashion has more to offer than the traditional saree.

Amit, who will be showcasing his couture line for autumn winter 2017 at the grand finale of Amazon Fashion Week with his mentor Tarun Tahiliani, feels there is a need to contemporise the Indian textiles.

"There is a hue and cry about 'Made in India'. But when we are trying to save our heritage and put as a real contender on the world map, we should also look at the advancements in the industry.

"I don't think Indian fashion is just about weaving unbelievable yards of fabric, which cannot be converted into international fashion," says Amit.

The designer says his collection will showcase a "fresh, new look" where "organic or hand-woven textiles are mixed with industrial waste".

"We are connected to our heritage in multiple ways through our families, parents or the history of the bygone years. We have plugged this theme with the bridal wear for the first time on the runway. It is about saving and giving a new language to old hand-woven textiles."

Talking about the equation he shares with his mentor, Amit says although he has worked under Tahiliani, he has grown his own aesthetics.

He says the collection celebrates the blending together of their individual styles.

"We both love jewelled tones for a quintessential trousseau look and that's where we tie in together. Tarun also enjoys the fact that I play a lot with structure and volume and yet keep femininity in place."

Amit says the collection that he will showcase with Tahiliani is a great blend of everyday wear for a woman to hi-end pieces to bridal trousseau.

"It is basically the entire journey of a woman's wardrobe. There is not just heavily embellished couture but also easy separate shirts that you can pair up with a beautiful lehenga skirt.

"There is also a choice where a beautiful sari can be worn with a moulded corset or a pair of pants. You can wear it like a suit as well, then throw in a jacket. You actually break it down... There's an option for a million things in the collection," says Amit.

The shoes and jewellery are like the icing on the cake for every fashion designer's collection. This time Aprajita Toor's footwear is going to light up the runway for Amit's show.

"The runway is going to be a semi-reflective surface. We wanted the models to appear as if they are floating in the air. So, we got the shoes made out of glass - transparent shoe with a 'dori' to keep it in place.

"The jewellery by Misho is beautiful and in curvy little forms which look really eclectic. It's a great addition to the show."

While the showstopper for the D-Day is expected to be a surprise, illustrious names from the industry such as fashion entrepreneurs Kalyani Chawla and Pernia Qureshi, editors like Nandini Bhalla will walk the ramp to support the designers on the grand finale on March 18 at Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Our fashion not just about unbelievable yards of fabric: Amit

Designer Amit Aggarwal says although mesmerising in its approach and culture, Indian fashion has more to offer than the traditional saree.

Amit, who will be showcasing his couture line for autumn winter 2017 at the grand finale of Amazon Fashion Week with his mentor Tarun Tahiliani, feels there is a need to contemporise the Indian textiles.

"There is a hue and cry about 'Made in India'. But when we are trying to save our heritage and put as a real contender on the world map, we should also look at the advancements in the industry.

"I don't think Indian fashion is just about weaving unbelievable yards of fabric, which cannot be converted into international fashion," says Amit.

The designer says his collection will showcase a "fresh, new look" where "organic or hand-woven textiles are mixed with industrial waste".

"We are connected to our heritage in multiple ways through our families, parents or the history of the bygone years. We have plugged this theme with the bridal wear for the first time on the runway. It is about saving and giving a new language to old hand-woven textiles."

Talking about the equation he shares with his mentor, Amit says although he has worked under Tahiliani, he has grown his own aesthetics.

He says the collection celebrates the blending together of their individual styles.

"We both love jewelled tones for a quintessential trousseau look and that's where we tie in together. Tarun also enjoys the fact that I play a lot with structure and volume and yet keep femininity in place."

Amit says the collection that he will showcase with Tahiliani is a great blend of everyday wear for a woman to hi-end pieces to bridal trousseau.

"It is basically the entire journey of a woman's wardrobe. There is not just heavily embellished couture but also easy separate shirts that you can pair up with a beautiful lehenga skirt.

"There is also a choice where a beautiful sari can be worn with a moulded corset or a pair of pants. You can wear it like a suit as well, then throw in a jacket. You actually break it down... There's an option for a million things in the collection," says Amit.

The shoes and jewellery are like the icing on the cake for every fashion designer's collection. This time Aprajita Toor's footwear is going to light up the runway for Amit's show.

"The runway is going to be a semi-reflective surface. We wanted the models to appear as if they are floating in the air. So, we got the shoes made out of glass - transparent shoe with a 'dori' to keep it in place.

"The jewellery by Misho is beautiful and in curvy little forms which look really eclectic. It's a great addition to the show."

While the showstopper for the D-Day is expected to be a surprise, illustrious names from the industry such as fashion entrepreneurs Kalyani Chawla and Pernia Qureshi, editors like Nandini Bhalla will walk the ramp to support the designers on the grand finale on March 18 at Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22