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Polish powerbroker Kaczynski rejects 'two-speed Europe'

AFP  |  Warsaw 

The powerful head of Poland's governing rightwing party today ruled out moves toward a "two-speed Europe", in remarks before a summit where the bloc will plot its post-Brexit future.

Jaroslaw Kaczynski has long insisted Poland wants to remain rooted in the European Union, but has rejected any notion of the "multi-speed EU" favoured by powerhouse states and France.



As central Europe's largest economy, Poland is concerned that as one of nine of the EU's current 28 members outside the eurozone, it could be left behind should countries in the currency bloc push ahead with integration.

"We cannot accept any kind of declarations about a two-speed Europe," Kaczynski, the leader of and Justice (PiS) and widely regarded as the country's de facto decision-maker, told the rightwing wSieci weekly.

"This would mean we would either be pushed out of the or degraded to a worse category member. We must oppose this with all our might," he said.

leaders meet at the March 25 summit in Rome to mark the EU's 60th birthday, a moment they hope to emphasise the bloc's unity as Britain is expected to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, starting a two-year countdown to Britain's departure.

"A two-speed would mean that the money would be concentrated in the West, among other reasons because will have to pay more to cover the debts of the euro area," Kaczynski said.

"More money will also be directed towards innovation in the older countries of the Union, which means significant losses for us.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Polish powerbroker Kaczynski rejects 'two-speed Europe'

The powerful head of Poland's governing rightwing party today ruled out moves toward a "two-speed Europe", in remarks before a EU summit where the bloc will plot its post-Brexit future. Jaroslaw Kaczynski has long insisted Poland wants to remain rooted in the European Union, but has rejected any notion of the "multi-speed EU" favoured by powerhouse states Germany and France. As central Europe's largest economy, Poland is concerned that as one of nine of the EU's current 28 members outside the eurozone, it could be left behind should countries in the currency bloc push ahead with integration. "We cannot accept any kind of declarations about a two-speed Europe," Kaczynski, the leader of Law and Justice (PiS) and widely regarded as the country's de facto decision-maker, told the rightwing wSieci weekly. "This would mean we would either be pushed out of the EU or degraded to a worse category member. We must oppose this with all our might," he said. EU leaders meet at the March 25 ... The powerful head of Poland's governing rightwing party today ruled out moves toward a "two-speed Europe", in remarks before a summit where the bloc will plot its post-Brexit future.

Jaroslaw Kaczynski has long insisted Poland wants to remain rooted in the European Union, but has rejected any notion of the "multi-speed EU" favoured by powerhouse states and France.

As central Europe's largest economy, Poland is concerned that as one of nine of the EU's current 28 members outside the eurozone, it could be left behind should countries in the currency bloc push ahead with integration.

"We cannot accept any kind of declarations about a two-speed Europe," Kaczynski, the leader of and Justice (PiS) and widely regarded as the country's de facto decision-maker, told the rightwing wSieci weekly.

"This would mean we would either be pushed out of the or degraded to a worse category member. We must oppose this with all our might," he said.

leaders meet at the March 25 summit in Rome to mark the EU's 60th birthday, a moment they hope to emphasise the bloc's unity as Britain is expected to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, starting a two-year countdown to Britain's departure.

"A two-speed would mean that the money would be concentrated in the West, among other reasons because will have to pay more to cover the debts of the euro area," Kaczynski said.

"More money will also be directed towards innovation in the older countries of the Union, which means significant losses for us.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
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Polish powerbroker Kaczynski rejects 'two-speed Europe'

The powerful head of Poland's governing rightwing party today ruled out moves toward a "two-speed Europe", in remarks before a summit where the bloc will plot its post-Brexit future.

Jaroslaw Kaczynski has long insisted Poland wants to remain rooted in the European Union, but has rejected any notion of the "multi-speed EU" favoured by powerhouse states and France.

As central Europe's largest economy, Poland is concerned that as one of nine of the EU's current 28 members outside the eurozone, it could be left behind should countries in the currency bloc push ahead with integration.

"We cannot accept any kind of declarations about a two-speed Europe," Kaczynski, the leader of and Justice (PiS) and widely regarded as the country's de facto decision-maker, told the rightwing wSieci weekly.

"This would mean we would either be pushed out of the or degraded to a worse category member. We must oppose this with all our might," he said.

leaders meet at the March 25 summit in Rome to mark the EU's 60th birthday, a moment they hope to emphasise the bloc's unity as Britain is expected to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, starting a two-year countdown to Britain's departure.

"A two-speed would mean that the money would be concentrated in the West, among other reasons because will have to pay more to cover the debts of the euro area," Kaczynski said.

"More money will also be directed towards innovation in the older countries of the Union, which means significant losses for us.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22