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Siberia birds make Chambal sanctuary their winter abode

Press Trust of India  |  Morena (MP) 

Exotic winged visitors from different parts of the world are descending in droves to the Chambal National Sanctuary here to avoid cold-climes in central and souther Europe.

Migratory birds of multiple hues from Siberia, Mongolia, China, Kazakhstan, and North are coming to the sanctuary. Their chirping is soothing and music to the ears of the tourists alongside Chambal river, ornithologist Dr Rishikesh Sharma told PTI today.



These birds start leaving their habitats due to snow fall and extreme cold conditions and make Chambal their home during winters, he said.

The winged creatures start coming to Chambal in the last week of October and return by March end, he said.

Around 22,000 to 24,000 winged visitors flock the sanctuary annually, Sharma said.

The sanctuary is spread over an area of 427 sq km, including ravines on the sides of Chambal river.

He said the sanctuary is home to around 196 species of birds, including 152 domestic species.

The ornithologist said the birds find the sanctuary a good habitat given that they prey on fish which are in abundance in the Chambal river.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Siberia birds make Chambal sanctuary their winter abode

Exotic winged visitors from different parts of the world are descending in droves to the Chambal National Sanctuary here to avoid cold-climes in central Asia and souther Europe. Migratory birds of multiple hues from Siberia, Mongolia, China, Kazakhstan, Tibet and North India are coming to the sanctuary. Their chirping is soothing and music to the ears of the tourists alongside Chambal river, ornithologist Dr Rishikesh Sharma told PTI today. These birds start leaving their habitats due to snow fall and extreme cold conditions and make Chambal their home during winters, he said. The winged creatures start coming to Chambal in the last week of October and return by March end, he said. Around 22,000 to 24,000 winged visitors flock the sanctuary annually, Sharma said. The sanctuary is spread over an area of 427 sq km, including ravines on the sides of Chambal river. He said the sanctuary is home to around 196 species of birds, including 152 domestic species. The ornithologist said ... Exotic winged visitors from different parts of the world are descending in droves to the Chambal National Sanctuary here to avoid cold-climes in central and souther Europe.

Migratory birds of multiple hues from Siberia, Mongolia, China, Kazakhstan, and North are coming to the sanctuary. Their chirping is soothing and music to the ears of the tourists alongside Chambal river, ornithologist Dr Rishikesh Sharma told PTI today.

These birds start leaving their habitats due to snow fall and extreme cold conditions and make Chambal their home during winters, he said.

The winged creatures start coming to Chambal in the last week of October and return by March end, he said.

Around 22,000 to 24,000 winged visitors flock the sanctuary annually, Sharma said.

The sanctuary is spread over an area of 427 sq km, including ravines on the sides of Chambal river.

He said the sanctuary is home to around 196 species of birds, including 152 domestic species.

The ornithologist said the birds find the sanctuary a good habitat given that they prey on fish which are in abundance in the Chambal river.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Siberia birds make Chambal sanctuary their winter abode

Exotic winged visitors from different parts of the world are descending in droves to the Chambal National Sanctuary here to avoid cold-climes in central and souther Europe.

Migratory birds of multiple hues from Siberia, Mongolia, China, Kazakhstan, and North are coming to the sanctuary. Their chirping is soothing and music to the ears of the tourists alongside Chambal river, ornithologist Dr Rishikesh Sharma told PTI today.

These birds start leaving their habitats due to snow fall and extreme cold conditions and make Chambal their home during winters, he said.

The winged creatures start coming to Chambal in the last week of October and return by March end, he said.

Around 22,000 to 24,000 winged visitors flock the sanctuary annually, Sharma said.

The sanctuary is spread over an area of 427 sq km, including ravines on the sides of Chambal river.

He said the sanctuary is home to around 196 species of birds, including 152 domestic species.

The ornithologist said the birds find the sanctuary a good habitat given that they prey on fish which are in abundance in the Chambal river.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22