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Sufi music can spread peace, love in times of unrest: Artistes

Press Trust of India  |  Jaipur 

Sufi music can help spread the message of peace and love in the contemporary world that is marred by unrest and violence, artistes resolved during day two of the three-day Sufi festival here.

In a discussion over Sufi music, classical and carnatic singer Vidya Shah said it is not only beautiful to listen to but carries deeper meanings too.



"One should look beyond the obvious while listening to Sufi music. In the recent times of unrest and violence, Sufi music is relevant to spread the message of peace and love," she said.

Shah said there is nothing "erroneous" about Sufi music as long as it has the right "intent".

Author Sadia Dehlvi also talked about misconceptions surrounding Sufism.

"The recent trend has been to de-link Sufism from Islam. However, it is the heart of Islam. The Arabic word for Sufism 'Tasawwuf' has always been an integral part of Islam," she asserted.

Dehlvi said that Sufi music should lead to righteousness and God.

She also cautioned against using the word 'Sufi' with frivolity as it leads to the "loss of essence" of Sufism.

Kathak dancer Ojasi said that the term 'classical' has always been synonymous with 'divine'.

"One can reach the divine consciousness through a focused movement in dance. The divine consciousness gets fixed right in the body of the artiste, making him/her a spiritual practitioner," she said, adding viewers attain divine consciousness when they enter within themselves.

In the session 'Women and Sufism", Chairperson Rajasthan State Commission for Women Suman Sharma, writer Archana Thapa, Kashmiri poet Tarannum Riyaz and Buddhist monk Rahula shared their views on the topic.

Throwing light on the similarities between the tenets of Buddhism and Sufism, Rahula said both reject the idea of male domination and do not discriminate on the basis of gender, religion or race.

A Sufi Calligraphy workshop by Professor Raza Khan and a discussion by Jaipur Book Lovers on the topic 'Rumi and other Poets' was also held during the day.

The panel discussions were centred on a multitude of themes, like the Art and Sufism, Women and Sufism, Media for Harmony, Music andSpirituality among others.

The second-day witnessed poetry sessions, panel discussion, paper presentations, music and dance.

The festival is jointly organised by the Foundation of SAARC Writers and Literature (FOSWAL), Ministry of External Affairs and Rajasthan Tourism.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Sufi music can spread peace, love in times of unrest: Artistes

Sufi music can help spread the message of peace and love in the contemporary world that is marred by unrest and violence, artistes resolved during day two of the three-day Sufi festival here. In a discussion over Sufi music, classical and carnatic singer Vidya Shah said it is not only beautiful to listen to but carries deeper meanings too. "One should look beyond the obvious while listening to Sufi music. In the recent times of unrest and violence, Sufi music is relevant to spread the message of peace and love," she said. Shah said there is nothing "erroneous" about Sufi music as long as it has the right "intent". Author Sadia Dehlvi also talked about misconceptions surrounding Sufism. "The recent trend has been to de-link Sufism from Islam. However, it is the heart of Islam. The Arabic word for Sufism 'Tasawwuf' has always been an integral part of Islam," she asserted. Dehlvi said that Sufi music should lead to righteousness and God. She also cautioned against using the word ... Sufi music can help spread the message of peace and love in the contemporary world that is marred by unrest and violence, artistes resolved during day two of the three-day Sufi festival here.

In a discussion over Sufi music, classical and carnatic singer Vidya Shah said it is not only beautiful to listen to but carries deeper meanings too.

"One should look beyond the obvious while listening to Sufi music. In the recent times of unrest and violence, Sufi music is relevant to spread the message of peace and love," she said.

Shah said there is nothing "erroneous" about Sufi music as long as it has the right "intent".

Author Sadia Dehlvi also talked about misconceptions surrounding Sufism.

"The recent trend has been to de-link Sufism from Islam. However, it is the heart of Islam. The Arabic word for Sufism 'Tasawwuf' has always been an integral part of Islam," she asserted.

Dehlvi said that Sufi music should lead to righteousness and God.

She also cautioned against using the word 'Sufi' with frivolity as it leads to the "loss of essence" of Sufism.

Kathak dancer Ojasi said that the term 'classical' has always been synonymous with 'divine'.

"One can reach the divine consciousness through a focused movement in dance. The divine consciousness gets fixed right in the body of the artiste, making him/her a spiritual practitioner," she said, adding viewers attain divine consciousness when they enter within themselves.

In the session 'Women and Sufism", Chairperson Rajasthan State Commission for Women Suman Sharma, writer Archana Thapa, Kashmiri poet Tarannum Riyaz and Buddhist monk Rahula shared their views on the topic.

Throwing light on the similarities between the tenets of Buddhism and Sufism, Rahula said both reject the idea of male domination and do not discriminate on the basis of gender, religion or race.

A Sufi Calligraphy workshop by Professor Raza Khan and a discussion by Jaipur Book Lovers on the topic 'Rumi and other Poets' was also held during the day.

The panel discussions were centred on a multitude of themes, like the Art and Sufism, Women and Sufism, Media for Harmony, Music andSpirituality among others.

The second-day witnessed poetry sessions, panel discussion, paper presentations, music and dance.

The festival is jointly organised by the Foundation of SAARC Writers and Literature (FOSWAL), Ministry of External Affairs and Rajasthan Tourism.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

Sufi music can spread peace, love in times of unrest: Artistes

Sufi music can help spread the message of peace and love in the contemporary world that is marred by unrest and violence, artistes resolved during day two of the three-day Sufi festival here.

In a discussion over Sufi music, classical and carnatic singer Vidya Shah said it is not only beautiful to listen to but carries deeper meanings too.

"One should look beyond the obvious while listening to Sufi music. In the recent times of unrest and violence, Sufi music is relevant to spread the message of peace and love," she said.

Shah said there is nothing "erroneous" about Sufi music as long as it has the right "intent".

Author Sadia Dehlvi also talked about misconceptions surrounding Sufism.

"The recent trend has been to de-link Sufism from Islam. However, it is the heart of Islam. The Arabic word for Sufism 'Tasawwuf' has always been an integral part of Islam," she asserted.

Dehlvi said that Sufi music should lead to righteousness and God.

She also cautioned against using the word 'Sufi' with frivolity as it leads to the "loss of essence" of Sufism.

Kathak dancer Ojasi said that the term 'classical' has always been synonymous with 'divine'.

"One can reach the divine consciousness through a focused movement in dance. The divine consciousness gets fixed right in the body of the artiste, making him/her a spiritual practitioner," she said, adding viewers attain divine consciousness when they enter within themselves.

In the session 'Women and Sufism", Chairperson Rajasthan State Commission for Women Suman Sharma, writer Archana Thapa, Kashmiri poet Tarannum Riyaz and Buddhist monk Rahula shared their views on the topic.

Throwing light on the similarities between the tenets of Buddhism and Sufism, Rahula said both reject the idea of male domination and do not discriminate on the basis of gender, religion or race.

A Sufi Calligraphy workshop by Professor Raza Khan and a discussion by Jaipur Book Lovers on the topic 'Rumi and other Poets' was also held during the day.

The panel discussions were centred on a multitude of themes, like the Art and Sufism, Women and Sufism, Media for Harmony, Music andSpirituality among others.

The second-day witnessed poetry sessions, panel discussion, paper presentations, music and dance.

The festival is jointly organised by the Foundation of SAARC Writers and Literature (FOSWAL), Ministry of External Affairs and Rajasthan Tourism.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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