Two thirds 'hit the bottle' to cope with work stress: Survey

A survey of more than 2,000 people aged between 35 and 45 years in the UK also found that a fifth of men and nearly one in six women admit they drink daily or most days of the week just to relax after a stressful day at work.

It found that four out of 10 women and a third of men said they were drinking more than the Government's daily unit guidelines, which are set at 3-4 units for men and 2-3 units for women.

Almost half of the people questioned (44 per cent) said they were more likely to drink after a stressful day and more than a third (37 per cent) said they thought about having a drink on the way home.

The majority of those questioned (60 per cent) blamed work for their stress levels while half blamed financial worries and more than a third (36 per cent) said family life caused stress, the researchers found.

"Alcohol can be a 'false friend' when you are trying to deal with stress, said Siobhan McCann, head of campaigns and communications at Drinkaware which commissioned the survey.

"Even though it might seem like a few drinks can relieve the pressures of the day, in the medium to long term it can actually add to them whether they're work, financial or family related," McCann was quoted as saying by the Daily Mail.

He said: "Stress can also be an excuse for people to drink more than they should, especially if they don't realise the negative impact it can have on their health and wellbeing.

"Think about your evening routine - if you spend most of your time on the sofa with a drink in your hand, look at other hobbies you can enjoy with family and friends to help clear your mind. With a summer of sport ahead, there has never been a better time to get out and get active."

Prof Paul Wallace, chief medical adviser to Drinkaware, said alcohol can disrupt sleep, cause weight gain and increase the risk of cancer, heart and liver disease.

"The more you consume, the more your body gets used to it. So make a point of having days off from drinking so that your body doesn't develop a tolerance to alcohol," he said.

  

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Business Standard
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Business Standard

Two thirds 'hit the bottle' to cope with work stress: Survey

Press Trust of India  |  London 

A survey of more than 2,000 people aged between 35 and 45 years in the UK also found that a fifth of men and nearly one in six women admit they drink daily or most days of the week just to relax after a stressful day at work.

It found that four out of 10 women and a third of men said they were drinking more than the Government's daily unit guidelines, which are set at 3-4 units for men and 2-3 units for women.

Almost half of the people questioned (44 per cent) said they were more likely to drink after a stressful day and more than a third (37 per cent) said they thought about having a drink on the way home.

The majority of those questioned (60 per cent) blamed work for their stress levels while half blamed financial worries and more than a third (36 per cent) said family life caused stress, the researchers found.

"Alcohol can be a 'false friend' when you are trying to deal with stress, said Siobhan McCann, head of campaigns and communications at Drinkaware which commissioned the survey.

"Even though it might seem like a few drinks can relieve the pressures of the day, in the medium to long term it can actually add to them whether they're work, financial or family related," McCann was quoted as saying by the Daily Mail.

He said: "Stress can also be an excuse for people to drink more than they should, especially if they don't realise the negative impact it can have on their health and wellbeing.

"Think about your evening routine - if you spend most of your time on the sofa with a drink in your hand, look at other hobbies you can enjoy with family and friends to help clear your mind. With a summer of sport ahead, there has never been a better time to get out and get active."

Prof Paul Wallace, chief medical adviser to Drinkaware, said alcohol can disrupt sleep, cause weight gain and increase the risk of cancer, heart and liver disease.

"The more you consume, the more your body gets used to it. So make a point of having days off from drinking so that your body doesn't develop a tolerance to alcohol," he said.

  

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Two thirds 'hit the bottle' to cope with work stress: Survey

How do you manage your stress? Well, about two thirds of people turn to alcohol to help them cope after a stressful day, a new research has found.

A survey of more than 2,000 people aged between 35 and 45 years in the UK also found that a fifth of men and nearly one in six women admit they drink daily or most days of the week just to relax after a stressful day at work.

It found that four out of 10 women and a third of men said they were drinking more than the Government's daily unit guidelines, which are set at 3-4 units for men and 2-3 units for women.

Almost half of the people questioned (44 per cent) said they were more likely to drink after a stressful day and more than a third (37 per cent) said they thought about having a drink on the way home.

The majority of those questioned (60 per cent) blamed work for their stress levels while half blamed financial worries and more than a third (36 per cent) said family life caused stress, the researchers found.

"Alcohol can be a 'false friend' when you are trying to deal with stress, said Siobhan McCann, head of campaigns and communications at Drinkaware which commissioned the survey.

"Even though it might seem like a few drinks can relieve the pressures of the day, in the medium to long term it can actually add to them whether they're work, financial or family related," McCann was quoted as saying by the Daily Mail.

He said: "Stress can also be an excuse for people to drink more than they should, especially if they don't realise the negative impact it can have on their health and wellbeing.

"Think about your evening routine - if you spend most of your time on the sofa with a drink in your hand, look at other hobbies you can enjoy with family and friends to help clear your mind. With a summer of sport ahead, there has never been a better time to get out and get active."

Prof Paul Wallace, chief medical adviser to Drinkaware, said alcohol can disrupt sleep, cause weight gain and increase the risk of cancer, heart and liver disease.

"The more you consume, the more your body gets used to it. So make a point of having days off from drinking so that your body doesn't develop a tolerance to alcohol," he said.

  
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